Occupy SF protesters pitch tents, shut down Market Street after raid

Occupy SF protesters pitch tents, shut down Market Street after raid

Occupy SF protesters on Sunday continued to defy city orders to stop camping in front of the Federal Reserve Bank — literally taking to the street to air their grievances after tents were removed and people were arrested early in the morning.

Demonstrators set up tents and hunkered down in the middle of Market Street in front of the bank beginning at 4:30 p.m., chanting slogans as police stood by.

“When Occupy is under attack, what do you do? Stand up, fight back!” the crowd of some 200 people shouted.
As of press time, six tents and about 50 people remained at the site.

Early Sunday morning, San Francisco police and Public Works  employees removed 12 tents from in front of the Federal Reserve Bank at 101 Market St. The camp was located two blocks west of the main Occupy SF encampment at Justin Herman Plaza.

Police said six people were arrested for interfering with the action, which took place shortly after 1 a.m. After the campers were removed, police set up barricades to prevent them from returning.

On Sunday afternoon, protesters held a rally near Justin Herman Plaza before marching to the Market Street site, vowing to “retake the Fed.”

At an evening news conference held in the middle of Market Street, a man who identified himself as James, 33, said he was the first person arrested Sunday morning.

“They did not give us any warning,” he said. “They did not even give us a chance to get out of our tents.”

James and others reported that their tents and belongings, including clothing and computers, were put into Public Works trucks and taken away.

Public Works on Thursday had issued a final notice ordering all tents gone from the Market Street site, citing health and safety issues and violations of city codes. Tents in between Justin Herman Plaza and the Federal Reserve Bank were removed earlier in the week.

Supervisor David Campos, speaking at the Market Street news conference Sunday, asked Mayor Ed Lee not to order any further police action against Occupy SF.

“I am here to ask the rest of the city government to dialogue with the Occupy movement so that San Francisco can be a model for the rest of the country,” Campos said.

Campos was accompanied by Supervisor Eric Mar and state Assemblyman Tom Ammiano, along with labor leaders. Daniel Ellsberg, known for leaking the Pentagon Papers to newspapers in 1971, spoke to the crowd as well.

acrawford@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsencampmentLocalSan Francisco

Just Posted

San Francisco Giants manager Gabe Kapler, pictured in July at Oracle Park, says team members simultaneously can be “measured and calm” and “looking to push the accelerator.” (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
How Gabe Kapler sets the tone for Giants’ success with strategy, mindset

‘There’s no doubt in my mind that he’s the hands-down manager of the year’

Artist Agnieszka Pilat, pictured with Spot the Robot Dog from Boston Robotics, has a gallery show opening at Modernism. (Courtesy Agnieszka Pilat)
Screenshots of VCs, Kanye and tech parties by the Bay

In this week’s roundup, Ben Horowitz’s surprising hip-hop knowledge and the chic tech crowd at Shack15

Speaker of the Parliament of Mongolia Gombojav Zandanshatar said his country and San Francisco face similar challenges on issues including COVID recovery and climate change.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Mongolian leaders meet with tech, film leaders on city tour

‘I really want San Franciscans to meet the new Mongolian generation’

If he secured a full term in the Senate, Newsom would become the most powerful Californian Democrat since Phil Burton at the height of his career, or maybe ever. <ins>(Kevin Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Firefighters extinguish burning material near Lake Tahoe on Sept. 3 in the wake of the Caldor Fire; environmental scientists say the huge fire is bringing to light deficiencies in forest management. <ins>(Max Whittaker/New York Times)</ins>
Cal Fire, timber industry must face an inconvenient truth

We are logging further into the wildfire and climate crisis

Most Read