Occupy SF protesters brace for post-election crackdown

Occupy SF protesters expect the other shoe to drop now that the mayoral election is over. (Examiner file photo)Occupy SF protesters expect the other shoe to drop now that the mayoral election is over. (Examiner file photo)

Now that the election is over, Occupy San Francisco protesters will be sleeping with one eye open to look out for the nighttime police raid that many fear is imminent.

Law enforcement may have tiptoed around the camp in the days leading up to the end of the mayoral campaign, protesters agreed Wednesday, but now that incumbent Ed Lee is headed toward a full term, The City is more likely to move against their camp at Justin Herman Plaza.

“There’s a lot of us worried about it,” said Andrew Carrigan, 20. “I’m worried about it.”

Carrigan, who joined the protest about two weeks ago over mounting frustration that his two jobs weren’t enough to make ends meet, said he expected the other shoe to drop within the next 10 days.

He was among the protesters who believed that the camp’s fate might have been different if Supervisor John Avalos, who has been supportive of Occupy SF, had pulled off an upset win in the mayoral race. But many others, including a man who identified himself as Two Horses, had already given up hope on a victory for Avalos, who trailed Lee Wednesday morning and ultimately came in second.

Two Horses said he didn’t think Lee’s victory would trigger a raid on the camp. “Not immediately; not Oakland-style,” he said.

San Francisco police spokesman Sgt. Daryl Fong said he was not aware of any plans to raid the camp. Health inspectors have also been keeping an eye on the protesters, making visits at least twice a day to inspect areas where food is being served, said Two Horses, who works in the camp’s kitchen. Kitchen workers have been diligent in promptly addressing problems pointed out by inspectors, he said.  

Regardless of whether police say they will take action, some protesters say bring it on.

“We’ll just come back stronger than ever,” said Chris Reynolds-Hawkins, a discouraged college graduate who joined the protest about a month ago.

“The camp gets stronger and the bonds that bind us get tighter,” he said. “Whatever happens, we’ll be ready for it.”

sgantz@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsJohn AvalosLocalPoliticsSan Francisco

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

BART Ambassadors are being called on to assist riders in social situations that don’t require police force. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Unarmed BART ambassadors program formalized with a focus on community service

Public safety and police reform are key elements in campaigns of Board members Dufty and Simon

San Francisco DJ and producer Jah Yzer livestreams most mornings from his home. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Roots & Tings build community through music

Lateef the Truthspeaker, Jah Yzer and Winstrong call for voting as a form of healing

On Oct. 13, people lined up to vote early for the presidential election in Southlake, Texas. <ins>(Shutterstock)</ins>
<ins></ins>
Five things to watch for in the run-up to Nov. 3

Down-ballot races, as much as the presidency, will determine the future course of this nation

WeChat (Shutterstock)
U.S. District Court denies Trump request to shutdown WeChat app

A federal judge in San Francisco denied a request by the U.S.… Continue reading

School board members Gabriela Lopez (left) and Alison Collins (right) say they have been the subject of frequent hateful, racist and sexist attacks during their time on the school board. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F Examiner)
Angered by Lowell decision, SFUSD grad targets school board members with violent imagery

Facebook page depicts two women of color on board with swastikas and x-marks on their faces

Most Read