Oakland stadium drops McAfee name

The stadium where the Oakland A's and the Oakland Raiders play is going back to its original name today: the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum.

That's because McAfee Inc.'s 10-year contract with the board that oversees the stadium expired Thursday and the security products and services company chose not to renew it.

Network Associates bought the Coliseum naming rights in September 1998 for $13.2 million over 10 years.

The stadium was first renamed the Network Associates Coliseum, but in April 2004 the name was changed to the McAfee Coliseum because the Santa Clara-based company renamed itself.

Oakland City Council President Ignacio De La Fuente, the chair of the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum Authority, said in a statement, “This ends a ten-year long partnership with McAfee. It's unfortunate to see McAfee pass on renewing their contract, but this leaves the opportunity open to another business to brand our facility.”

In addition to being the home of the Raiders and the A's, the Coliseum has hosted large-scale concerts such as The Police in 2007 and The Rolling Stones in 2006, drawing hundreds of thousands of people a year.

Coliseum Authority officials say a company's name on the stadium also has prime visibility from the Interstate Highway 880 freeway, which receives an average of 150,000 cars daily.

Alameda County Supervisor Scott Haggerty, the Coliseum board's vice chair, said, “Sponsoring the stadium is a terrific opportunity for any entity desiring a high-profile, highly visible, long-term marketing option.”

The indoor arena next to the outdoor stadium is home to the Golden State Warriors and is called the Oracle Arena, as the Redwood Shores-based software company bought the naming rights.

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