Norton tells of finding body, denies killing

Wiping his eyes and with a voice choked with emotion, accused murderer Quincy Norton took the stand for the second day Thursday and described returning from his girlfriend’s house to find his wife dead in a pool of blood.

“She had dried blood on her face and her eyes were looking to the side,” he testified. “I kept staring at her and she wasn’t breathing.”

The 33-year-old Daly City man, who is accused of fatally stabbing Tamika Mack Norton to death on July 22, 2006, also implied in his testimony that girlfriend Anitra Johnson could be the real killer.

Norton said Johnson became angry the night before the murder after Norton told her that he and his wife, who were planning to divorce, had decided to go to marriage counseling.

Johnson told Norton to get out of her house in the middle of the night, but when he walked out to his car, he discovered he didn’t have his keys. He then witnessed Johnson pulling out of her garage and driving away. Norton said he realized Johnson had taken his car and house keys, so he went back into her home and fell asleep. He awoke some time later to the sound of Johnson washing her hands in the bathroom, he testified.

Norton’s defenseattorney Patricia Fox has claimed Johnson’s DNA was found on the handle of the murder weapon. However, experts for the prosecution have testified that the knife’s blade did not match Mack Norton’s wounds, and that biological material can transfer from one person to another.

During cross examination, Deputy District Attorney Al Giannini asked Norton why he didn’t call authorities when he found his wife.

“Your first concern was getting out of the house instead of getting help for the wife that you loved?” Giannini asked.

“No, my first concern was for my children and getting them to a safe place,” Norton said

Norton also said that he believed multiple members of his wife’s family fabricated testimony about his previous abuse of Mack Norton. The couple’s eldest son, who testified he heard his mother scream and saw his father standing over her the morning of the murder, was mistaken, Norton said.

“He’s said a lot of things in court I’m surprised at. The majority of things he’s said in court are not true,” Norton said.

tbarak@examiner.com 

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