Nonprofits slapping Muni’s hand out of their pockets

S.F. Examiner File PhotoGot change? Supervisor Scott Wiener has seemingly done everything but dance for nickels in his quest to fix Muni; his recent bid to raise transit fee revenues failed.

S.F. Examiner File PhotoGot change? Supervisor Scott Wiener has seemingly done everything but dance for nickels in his quest to fix Muni; his recent bid to raise transit fee revenues failed.

Supervisor Scott Wiener is trying hard to fix Muni, but no one wants to pay for it. With $420 million in deferred maintenance and a $100 million deficit each year, the prospect of getting our public-transportation system on track is getting more remote.

One revenue stream for the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency is the Transit Impact Development Fee. All commercial developments larger than 3,000 square feet are assessed a fee (around $12 per square foot) that pays to offset the strain on our transportation system created by the development. Nonprofits — even big ones such as hospitals, universities and museums — have traditionally been exempt from the fee.

On Tuesday, Wiener tried to gin up some money for Muni by assessing the fee on nonprofits that build facilities larger than 25,000 square feet.

In support of Wiener’s proposal, Joel Ramos, a member of the agency’s board of directors, pleaded, “We can’t say enough about how bad our system is suffering.” He went on to say, “We can no longer continue on the status quo of exempting these large institutions that put such a strain on the system,” and “missed runs, overcrowded buses, all these things are what happen when we underfund our system.”

Supervisor Sean Elsbernd then reminded Ramos that he had just voted in favor of spending $1.6 million in Muni maintenance money on five months of free passes for low-income youths. Still, citing concerns about nonprofit schools in his district, Elsbernd voted to keep the exemption. So did every other supervisor except Wiener and Carmen Chu.

In related news, citywide enforcement of Sunday parking meters begins on Jan. 6, 2013.

Bay Area NewsBoard of SupervisorsGovernment & PoliticsLocalMuniPolitics

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

After the pandemic hit, Twin Peaks Boulevard was closed to vehicle traffic, a situation lauded by open space advocates. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
New proposal to partially reopen Twin Peaks to vehicles pleases no one

Neighbors say closure brought crime into residential streets, while advocates seek more open space

Members of the Sheriff’s Department command staff wore masks at a swearing-in ceremony for Assistant Sheriff Tanzanika Carter. One attendee later tested positive. 
Courtesy SFSD
Sheriff sees increase in COVID-19 cases as 3 captains test positive

Command staff among 10 infected members in past week

Rainy weather is expected in the coming week. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Rainstorms, potential atmospheric river expected to drench Bay Area in coming week

By Eli Walsh Bay City News Foundation Multiple rainstorms, cold temperatures some… Continue reading

U.S. Poet Laureate Amanda Gorman’s powerful reading was among the highlights of Inauguration Day. (Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times/TNS)
Inauguration shines light in this never-ending shade

Here’s to renewal and resolve in 2021 and beyond

Lowell High School is considered an academically elite public school. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Students denounce ‘rampant, unchecked racism’ at Lowell after slurs flood anti-racism lesson

A lesson on anti-racism at Lowell High School on Wednesday was bombarded… Continue reading

Most Read