Noe Valley getting greener

Property owners in area plant trees, hope arboreal growth will attract business

Building owners on 24th and Noe streets were up early on a recent Wednesday planting trees along their sidewalks, hoping the extra green would attract more people to their neighborhood.

The recently formedNoe Valley Association of Commercial Benefit District spearheaded the effort to plant 32 trees, ranging from sycamores to flowering cherries, in front of the restaurants and businesses along 24th Street.

Debra Niemann, the executive director of the association, said a study done by the Wharton School of Business found that a “healthy tree canopy increases foot traffic, attracts shoppers and reduces petty crime.” Mei Ling Hui, of Friends of the Urban Forest, said another study conducted by the University of Washington showed that business areas with trees see an increase in sales of 12 percent. The Wharton study says traffic is increased because residents feel safer in neighborhoods with trees, since they make the area more inviting and also reduce noise and improve health.

“It’s the best way you can improve public space,” Niemann said. “It’s just the aesthetics that trees provide. It can bring shade and cool on a hot day.”

Businesses and building owners are committed to beautifying the neighborhood so much that they agreed to have an additional fee added on their annual property taxes to pay for planting the trees, as well as cleaning the streets and maintaining benches and garbage cans. The tax varies based on the square footage of each building, but Niemann said on average building owners pay $900 a year for the service.

The newly founded association is part of a larger movement across The City to establish community benefit districts to help maintain neighborhoods. The Board of Supervisors, which must sign off on every benefit district, recently agreed to let the Fillmore neighborhood form The City’s seventh district.

The association plans to plant another 40 trees on the street in November. They have identified that they need to plant 98 trees in the area to achieve maximum benefit.

The City could use more trees, according to Hui, who said San Francisco is not as green as other majorcities in the country.

Bay Area NewsLocal

Just Posted

A collaborative workspace for a decentralized autonomous organization (DAO) in Coordinape is pictured at a recent blockchain meet up at Atlas Cafe. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Business without bosses: San Francisco innovators battle bureaucracy with blockchain

‘The next generation will work for three DAOs at the same time’

Plan Bay Area 2050 is an expansive plan guiding the region’s growth and development over the next three decades. The regional plan addresses progressive policy priorities like a universal basic income and a region-wide rent cap, alongside massive new spending on affordable housing and transportation infrastructure. (Shutterstock)
Plan Bay Area 2050: Analyzing an extensive regional plan that covers the next 30 years

Here are the big ticket proposals in the $1.4 trillion proposal

Pregnant women are in the high-risk category currently prioritized for booster shots in San Francisco. (Unai Huizi/Shutterstock)
What pregnant women need to know about COVID and booster shots

Inoculations for immunosuppressed individuals are recommended in the second trimester

Examiner reporter Ben Schneider drives an Arcimoto Fun Utility Vehicle along Beach Street in Fisherman’s Wharf on Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Could San Francisco’s tiny tourist cruisers become the cars of the future?

‘Fun Utility Vehicles’ have arrived in The City

Most Read