No surprises in Redwood City as four incumbents retain city council seats

Clockwise from left

Clockwise from left

The results of the Redwood City Council election brought no surprises.

Four incumbents — Alicia Aguirre, Ian Bain, Rosanne Foust and Barbara Pierce — retained their open seats, while outsider Paul McCarthy, a Highway Patrol sergeant who spurned the media spotlight, failed in his bid for office.

Candidates sought to lead a city with falling revenues, increasing costs, and large upcoming payments for its redevelopment association, an entity Bain strongly supported.

The candidates campaigned on various ways to further pare the budget without dipping into reserves.

Aguirre’s platform included further cutting staff benefits and expanding regional partnerships with cities and business groups. Pierce campaigned on attracting visitors and residents with more housing and events. And Foust wanted to make sure employers are happy so that more come to town and create jobs.

The candidates generally avoided expressing definitive opinions about whether to build thousands of much-needed housing units on salt ponds owned by Cargill that lie outside the city’s current development footprint.

Bay Area NewsIan BainLocalPeninsulaRedwood City

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