Newsom requests nightlife security report by Sept. 1

Following violence in Union Square, “[Mayor Gavin Newsom] requested a group of venue operators to come to City Hall and talk with him about what could be done. And so approximately 12 venue operators met with the mayor, members of the staff, myself and commander Kitt Crenshaw,” said Jocelyn Kane, deputy director of San Francisco’s Entertainment Commission.

“The immediate discussion obviously was the reaction to the weekend incidents in Union Square and SoMa and focused essentially on how to further professionalize the industry and avoid these kinds of things in to the future,” she said. “It’s been a tough summer as you know.”

“The mayor showed his commitment I think to this by spending more than 1½ hours with the group without reaching for his cell at all, and was completely attentive, discussing the best practices, the ways in which The City, including the Police Department, the Entertainment Commission and his office could step up to promote a safer nightlife in general. The mayor has asked for a draft document of security best practices by the first of September,” Kane said.

Another meeting was held Aug. 18 where about 70 entertainment promoters showed up at City Hall with “conversations around the need to bring nightlife safety to San Francisco and professionalize the promotions industry,” Kane said.

She said there was “positive response” about an idea of requiring promoters to register if they hold events in San Francisco. Board of Supervisors President David Chiu is considering introducing legislation in September that would require a promoter registry.

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