Los Angeles, CA, Sunday, June 28,2020 - Patrons of the Down’n’Out Sports Bar, drink at an outside patio. Governor Newsom orders bars to close as Covid-19 cases surge in California. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles, CA, Sunday, June 28,2020 - Patrons of the Down’n’Out Sports Bar, drink at an outside patio. Governor Newsom orders bars to close as Covid-19 cases surge in California. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

Newsom orders indoor uses in gyms, salons, malls, churches, more to close

California is largely closing again amid a spike in coronavirus cases across the state, as Gov. Gavin Newsom announced statewide restrictions Monday to again halt all indoor dining and close bars, family entertainment, zoos and museums. At the same time, 30 counties will be forced to shutter gyms, churches, hair salons, malls and other businesses.

Los Angeles is one of the counties that will be subject to the new restrictions against indoor gatherings and services, as will all other Southern California counties, other than San Luis Obispo.

The move further pushes Californians back inside during a time typically marked by summer vacations. The stricter measures to close gyms, churches and other services are targeted at some of the most populous regions in the state, where 80% of California residents live.

“We’re seeing an increase in the spread of the virus, so that’s why it’s incumbent upon all of us to recognize soberly that COVID-19 is not going away any time soon until there is a vaccine or an effective therapy,” Newsom said Monday.

The setback comes after the state said June 12 that dine-in restaurants, retail stores, bars, religious services and gyms could reopen with modifications in counties that met the state’s guidelines. Newsom said the move Monday to resurrect tough restrictions was a response to a rise in COVID-19 hospitalizations in the state.

Newsom ordered tougher restrictions ahead of the July 4 holiday on indoor activities for counties experiencing a spike in infections. Counties are placed on a watch list when they experience a rise in hospitalization rates, community transmission or declining hospital capacity, with three consecutive days of troublesome trends requiring the area to add the restrictions. There are now 30 counties on that watch list, which, with Monday’s announcement, will now require gyms and churches to close.

Restaurants are still permitted to stay open for outdoor dining and takeout, while bars and breweries can serve drinks outdoors if they accompany the beverage with food.

As of Monday, California had more than 326,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and more than 7,000 total deaths, according to the Los Angeles Times’ tracker.

By Melody Gutierrez, Los Angeles Times

Bay Area NewsCaliforniaCoronavirusPolitics

Just Posted

The remnants of trees burned by the Dixie Fire near Antelope Lake, Calif., on Friday, Sept. 3, 2021. (Christian Monterrosa/The New York Times)
California’s wildfires invisible effect: high carbon dioxide emissions

This summer California fires emitted twice as much CO2 as last year

A man walks past the main entrance to the Hotel Whitcomb at Eighth and Market streets on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Closing hotels could disconnect hundreds from critical health care services

‘That baseline of humanity and dignity goes a long way’

Dreamforce returned to San Francisco in person this week – but with a tiny sliver of past attendance. (Courtesy Salesforce)
Dreamforce returns with hundreds on hand, down from 170,000 in the past

High hopes for a larger Salesforce conference shriveled during the summer

The numbers show nearly 14 percent of San Francisco voters who participated in the Sept. 14 recall election wanted to oust Gov. Gavin Newsom from elected office. (Shutterstock photo)
(Shutterstock photo)
How San Francisco neighborhoods voted in the Newsom recall

Sunset tops the list as the area with the most ‘yes’ votes

Alison Collins says that she and other members of San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education facing potential recall “represent constituents that are often erased or talked over.” <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Alison Collins speaks: Embattled SF school board member confronts the recall effort

‘It’s important for folks to know what this recall is about. It’s bigger than any one of us.’

Most Read