Newsom nominates Muni rider with background in finance for SFMTA opening

It’s been over seven months since the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency’s Board of Directors convened a meeting with all seven members present. Those shorthanded days may be finally coming to an end.

Mayor Gavin Newsom announced the nomination last week of Leona M. Bridges for the final vacancy on the SFMTA Board, which governs the $750 million transportation agency.

In May, long-time members James McCray and Shirley Black termed-out, leaving two vacancies on the board. In July, Newsom tapped transit advocate Cheryl Brinkman for the first of two openings.

Unlike Brinkman, who has an extensive background in transit and planning issues, Bridges’ relative experience is tied closely to the financial sector, although she is a regular user of the 38-Geary bus. Newsom stated earlier in the nomination process that he was looking for a regular Muni rider to serve on the SFMTA Board. Bridges formerly worked as a managing director at Barclays Global Investors.

“Leona Bridges will bring valuable financial knowledge and investment experience to the SFMTA Board,” Newsom said. “She may not be a City Hall insider or professional activist, but she’s a regular bus rider, churchgoer and longtime San Francisco resident whose background and financial expertise will enormously benefit the board. I’m grateful for her willingness to serve San Francisco’s transit riders and help improve our city’s public transit system.”

Bridges’ nomination must be approved by The City’s Board of Supervisors.

wreisman@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsGavin NewsomGovernment & PoliticsPoliticsSan FranciscoUnder the Dome

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