Newsom joins with other jurisdictions pleading for jobs funding

Mayor Gavin Newsom joined 18 other jurisdictions across the nation — including Los Angeles, Boston and New York — firing off a letter Wednesday to Congress asking, well, pleading with them, to release more money that would help employ thousands of workers across the nation for one more year.

In San Francisco, that program is better known as JobsNow, the stimulus-funded program that covers 100 percent of wages for workers hired through JobsNow.

To date, nearly 4,000 people have been employed through JobsNow, helping keep San Francisco’s unemployment rate from shooting above 10 percent. The legislation that has helped employ more than 240,000 people across the nation is set to expire Sept. 30.

“Absent extension of this critical program, nearly a quarter million people are at risk of becoming unemployed,” the letter reads. “It is now time for the Congress to act to preserve jobs for low-income Americans.”

Thirty-four states, the District of Columbia and the Virgin Islands are using these funds to implement high-impact subsidized employment programs that create jobs, put people back to work, and allow businesses to expand and stimulate economic recovery, officials said.

San Francisco was forced to suspend its JobsNow program at the end of August, prepping for the worst. Since then, Newsom has directed his staff to look into financial incentives that would encourage employers to retain their workers should the program not be extended.

esherbert@sfexaminer.com

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