New trash laws leading to bumper compost collections

New laws, education campaigns and green composting bins in San Francisco boosted the amount of waste collected for composting by 100 tons per day over the past year, according to San Francisco’s main waste hauling company.

A new city law took effect Wednesday that could see residents and businesses fined if they throw recyclable or compostable material into a black trash bin. Trash collected in black bins is trucked to a dump at the Altamont Pass.

Waste handling company Recology has been collecting 500 tons of organic-based material left in green composting bins every day this week – 25 percent more than the 400 tons collected that was being collected one year ago, according to Recology spokesman Robert Reed.

“That’s another 100 tons a day that’s being diverted from the landfill,” Reed said. “It’s being made into compost and the compost is being applied to vineyards. The vineyard managers are using that compost to grow cover crops like mustard and beans that have very long roots that carry nutrients and carbon into the soil.”

To help residents and businesses compost, the company is delivering more than 100 green bins per day, according to Reed.

Composting at some apartment buildings continues to flounder as nearly two-thirds of apartments still have not received a green cart, according to Reed.

Recology created a page on its website form where residents can request green carts, according to Reed.

 

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