The City of San Francisco released a map showing which areas of The City are most heavily impacted by coronavirus infections. (Courtesy photo)

The City of San Francisco released a map showing which areas of The City are most heavily impacted by coronavirus infections. (Courtesy photo)

New map of coronavirus cases shows low-income, people of color most impacted

Mission neighborhood has most people testing positive for COVID-19

Those testing positive for the coronavirus in San Francisco are more likely to be people of color and living in low-income neighborhoods, according to new data that illustrates The City’s long-standing inequities around health and income.

The data released Monday shows those who have tested positive by San Francisco zip codes and the rate of cases for each location.

The most cases, 166, are in the Mission where there is a large Latino population, followed by the Outer Mission with 134 cases.

In San Francisco, 25 percent of the positive cases, which totaled 1,216 Monday, were Latino. Latinos make up 15 percent of the total population.

City officials attributed this inequity to “risk factors,” including living in crowded conditions and “whether residents have sufficient support to stay home and reduce their outings.”

“What it reflects is the existing health disparities and inequality that existed within our city before COVID-19, which is why we continue to focus on protecting our most vulnerable residents,” Mayor London Breed said in a tweet.

The Bayview-Hunters Point neighborhood, the 94124 zip code, which has a large black population, has 94 cases and among the highest rates of infection. The Western Addition, the 94115 zip code, has 76 cases.

The South of Market area, zip code 94103 and the 94107 zip code, which also includes Potrero and Dogpatch, have 79 and 84 cases respectively and they have the highest rate of cases. City officials noted the high number of homeless persons in the area and the recent outbreak at SoMa’s MSC South, the largest homeless shelter where 96 people who stayed there have tested positive.

The data was announced Monday by Breed and Dr.Grant Colfax, head of the Department of Public Health.

“Health emergencies exploit the inequalities in society. People with fewer resources, chronic illnesses, underlying health conditions and who have experienced institutionalized stigma and discrimination are going to be more at risk for getting sick,” Colfax said in a statement. “This map is sobering. But, unfortunately it is not surprising.”

The City has tested 11,254 people out of a total population of about 880,000, according to the data.

Of the 20 persons who died from COVID-19 to date, the data shows 19 were over the age of 60. Eleven were Asian, three white, three black, one Latino and two unknown or other. The City did not provide zip code data for deaths.

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