New lease for Mexican Museum

The Mexican Museum will not be homeless this Christmas.

The museum’s collection of 12,000 objects, including paintings, sculptures and folk art, is currently in storage at Fort Mason and awaiting a new home in the culturally-rich Yerba Buena district in downtown San Francisco.

That new location, however, likely won’t be ready until after 2014.

Keeping the museum’s pieces at Fort Mason until it has a new home hasn’t been easy. Lease negotiations have been contentious.

However, the museum recently struck a short-term agreement that will allow it to remain in its current location through the end of December, Arts Commission chief Luis Cancel said today.

The agreement will allow the long-shuttered Mexican Museum to “reopen their store, and they are going to mount a temporary exhibition at Fort Mason,” Cancel said.

If that goes well, the museum might be able to extend the lease, Cancel said.

“That’s what of course we are hoping will take place so that we don’t have to incur the risk and expense of trying to relocate the collection of the Mexican Museum off of Fort Mason,” Cancel said.

The museum was founded in 1975 in the Mission district, where it displayed pieces dating from pre-Columbian times to modern Mexico.

But after the museum grew in popularity, it was relocated, in 1982, to Fort Mason in the Marina district.

About 20 years ago, the museum closed its doors to the public as it prepared to relocate to a new museum building in the Yerba Buena district.

But the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency changed its plans for the plot of land where the museum was going to be built, and the collection has been in storage since then.

The Redevelopment Agency now plans to allow a developer to build a condo tower at the site, which is on Mission Street next to the Contemporary Jewish Museum. Plans for the building include space to be set aside for the Mexican Museum.

In August, The Redevelopment Agency approved $280,000 in funding Aug. 4 for planning the museum's move in the Yerba Buena Cultural District.

Later that month, the Board of Supervisors voted unanimously in support of the move.
 

Bay Area NewsUnder the Dome

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

The most dangerous behaviors by drivers include failing to yield right-of-way at crosswalks, unsafe speeding and failing to stop at red lights or stop signs. <ins>(Ekevara Kitpowsong/Special to S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Hetch Hetchy in Yosemite, which supplies water to San Francisco, is among the concerns of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, which is undergoing a change of leadership. <ins>(Courtesy SFPUC)</ins>
Changes at SFPUC spark concern, hope

Will agency’s new commissioner continue to support Big Ag?

Supervisor Shamann Walton joined with community members to speak out against rising homicides, which have taken a heavy toll in the Bayview-Hunters Point in 2020. (Samantha Laurey/ Special to S.F Examiner)
SF homicides surpass 2019 total with month left in year

Police attribute rise to COVID-19, shootings and deadly gang violence

A screenshot from SFPD body worn camera
New videos show police shooting man armed with knife, frying pan

Police say Antonio Estrada set fire to apartment building before shooting

Dr. Grant Colfax, director of the Department of Public Health, said he expected San Francisco to enter the purple tier within days.
Chris Victorio/Special to S.F. Examiner
SF still in the red but expects move into purple tier ‘some time soon’

Four more counties moved into highest COVID-19 risk category by state

Most Read