New inmate locator makes it much easier to find someone in SF County Jail

The families and friends of inmates at San Francisco County Jail now have one less hurdle when it comes to locating someone who is behind bars.

A new inmate locator will make searching for a prisoner far easier and transparent, the San Francisco Sheriff’s Department announced Tuesday.

“We launched a new inmate locator system — this replaces the phone reservation line that’s tested the patience of many over the years,” said Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi in a statement. “With this straightforward foray into better customer service, comes a more transparent and accountable process in how our jail population is managed.”

The inmate locator, which can be found at sfsheriff.com, is meant to give a wide degree of transparency when it comes to inmates. By keying in the inmate’s name, booking number or city assigned number, a variety of information is accessible.

That information will include where the inmate is housed, the inmate’s charges, the bail amount, upcoming court dates, projected release date, docket number and age.

The new system can be accessed via cell phone or computer and is available in English, Spanish, Russian, Chinese and Vietnamese.

The inmate locator was built by the department’s IT services section in collaboration with The City’s department of technology.

CrimeInmate locatorRoss MirkarimiSan Francisco County JailSan Francisco Sheriff’s Departmentsfsheriff.com

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