New Fast Pass proposal would push cost to $55

Muni patrons have a respite from a Fast Pass price increase, but maybe only for one more year.

Despite a strong public outcry and opposition from its board of directors, Muni has proposed implementing a $10 increase to the monthly pass — although not until the 2009-10 fiscal year, according to the agency’s most recent budget proposal.

Faced with an $80.7 million projected budget shortfall over the next two years, Muni officials are also considering raising discounted pass prices by $5, imposing a $10 hike on all parking fines that are not capped and increasing the fee for parking boot removal by $130, according to the report. The 2008-09 fiscal year budget must be balanced by May 1.

The price increases, which would raise regular Fast Pass prices to $55 and discount prices to $15, are projected to bring the department $15.2 million, according to the report. Those fare increases would not be in place earlier than July 2009, according to Judson True, spokesman for the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency.

During the March 18 SFMTA board of directors meeting, overall sentiment among the directors was against raising fare prices until Muni established better on-time performance, which currently languishes below the 85 percent benchmark set by San Francisco voters in 1999.

True said results from the SFMTA’s Transit Effectiveness Project, the first in-depth examination of the department in years, should yield better performance rates in the future.

“This is the budget we need to start to transform the transportation system in San Francisco,” True said.

Andrew Sullivan, who heads the transportation advocacy group Rescue Muni, said raising multifare units would slow down performance times, because riders leery of paying the extra amount would resort to buying 90-minute transfer tickets with cash.

“Nothing slows down boarding more than people who stop to pay for the cash transfer,” Sullivan said. “It definitely has an impact on the on-time performance rate.”

wreisman@examiner.com

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

A server greets diners in a Shared Spaces outdoor dining area outside Napper Tandy’s Irish pub at 24th Street and South Van Ness Avenue in the Mission District on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020. San Francisco could choose to resume outdoor dining in the wake of a state decision to lift a regional stay-at-home order. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Regional coronavirus stay-at-home orders lifted as ICU capacity improves

Change in rules could allow outdoor dining to resume in San Francisco

A statue of Florence Nightingale outside the Laguna Honda Hospital is one of only two statues of women in The City. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
S.F. still falling short of goal to represent women in public art

City has few streets or public facilities not named after men

Methamphetamines (Sophia Valdes/SF Weekly)
New search launched for meth sobering center site

Pandemic put project on pause but gave health officials time to plan a better facility

Hasti Jafari Jozani quarantines at her brother's San Francisco home after obtaining several clearances to study at San Francisco State University. (Photo courtesy Siavash Jafari Jozani)
Sanctions, visas, and the pandemic: One Iranian student’s bumpy path to SF State

Changing immigration rules and travel restrictions leave some overseas students in limbo

Woody LaBounty, left, and David Gallagher started the Western Neighborhoods Project which has a Balboa Street office housing historical items and comprehensive website dedicated to the history of The City’s West side. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Outside Lands podcast delves into West side’s quirky past

History buffs Woody LaBounty and David Gallagher have been sharing fun stories about the Richmond and Sunset since 1998

Most Read