Neighbors could keep green home from being built

Burlingame, a city that prides itself on being environmentally friendly, faces a decision tonight on whether to approve construction of a resident’s green home or side with his disgruntled neighbors.

After a year of work and more than a month of Planning Commission meetings, Mike Kerwin was given approval to substantially upgrade his hillside home on Margarita Avenue off Skyline Boulevard. The house would feature recycled blue-jean denim insulation, wooden floors made from reclaimed mine timbers and solar panels to heat domestic water.

Kerwin, a San Francisco green builder with LORAX Development, is set to become the first Burlingame homeowner to comply with the GreenPoint rated system, an environmental grade given by a third-party organization called Build It Green.

But before Kerwin can renovate the home for himself, his wife and his daughter, the City Council must block appeal efforts made by his neighbors who say the changes would block their views and disturb the “rhythm” in the neighborhood.

Neighbors also thought their efforts to “preserve the neighborhood” were being overlooked because the city is pushing a so-called green agenda, they alleged.

It should, however, be especially difficult for the neighbors to win because new Councilmember Jerry Deal will not be able to vote. Deal was on the Planning Commission during the initial review and voted against the project. If the vote is tied, the Planning Commission’s ruling for Kerwin will stand because a majority is needed to overturn the ruling.

mrosenberg@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

San Francisco plans to reopen the Upper Great Highway, which had been closed for recreational use during the COVID pandemic. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
San Francisco plans to reopen the Upper Great Highway, which had been closed for recreational use during the COVID pandemic. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
San Francisco plans to reopen the Upper Great Highway, which had been closed for recreational use during the COVID pandemic. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Great Highway to reopen on weekdays, sparking renewed debate

The Upper Great Highway soon will reopen to vehicles for the first… Continue reading

Second grader Genesis Ulloa leads students in an after-school community hub in a game at the Mission YMCA on Friday, May 7, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SF parents face school year with hope, trepidation and concern

‘Honestly, I don’t know how I’m going to deal with it’

A fire lookout with the U.S. Forest Service feeds a chipmunk in the Tahoe National Forest. California officials closed some popular trails and nature areas in South Lake Tahoe for the week after a dead chipmunk tested positive for the plague. (Jim Wilson/The New York Times)
Yes, Lake Tahoe chipmunks have the plague. But don’t worry (too much)

By Johnny Diaz New York Times When California officials closed parts of… Continue reading

After nearly 15 years of being part of Google, the most successful money machine in internet history, it’s still not clear that YouTube has fulfilled its financial potential both for itself and everyone involved in its vast digital economy. (Dani Choi/The New York Times)
Is YouTube a success? It’s a serious question

By Shira Ovide New York Times This question will sound ridiculous, but… Continue reading

Most Read