Neighborhoods start letter campaign against signs on Fell and Oak

The local backlash is starting to get serious against a proposed set of traffic management signs on Fell and Oak streets.

Neighborhood groups from the North of Panhandle and Alamo Square communities have begun a letter-writing campaign, urging Muni to abandon the controversial plan to erect a set of freeway-like message boards on Fell and Oak streets.

The signs are part of Muni’s SFgo program, a set of a pilot projects aimed at easing congestion and improving traffic measures throughout The City.

However, the folks over at the North of Panhandle Neighborhood Association and the Alamo Square Neighborhood Association say that the traffic signs on Fell and Oak do just the opposite by encouraging drivers to think of the streets as busy freeways.

In his letter addressed to Muni executive director Nat Ford, NOPNA president Kevin Rafter wrote, “our neighborhood is outraged that these signs are going up, as was voiced in our neighborhood meeting on September 17 where we had over 80 people in attendance.”

Residents from Alamo Square and North of Panhandle are also urging Supervisor Ross Mirkarimi to intervene on their behalf.

wreisman@sfexaminer.com

 

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