A woman rides a Jump Bike along Market Street on April 9, 2018. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

A woman rides a Jump Bike along Market Street on April 9, 2018. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Neighbor complaints force Uber to shut down Marina Jump bike repair shop

The clanks and clangs rattling Marina District neighbors from a Green Street e-bike repair shop will finally cease.

Uber is ending operations at its Jump bike facility in the Marina District on Dec. 1.

Neighborhood complaints dogged the Jump facility, which cleaned, repaired, and recharged electric bikes 24-hours a day.

“The Planning Department has received multiple complaints about noise, double parking, and blocking of neighborhood driveway [sic] by the JUMP bikes employees at all hours,” the Planning Department wrote in its second notice to Uber on November 16. “Late night and early morning operation is causing disturbance to nearby neighbors.”

The repair facility was threatened with $250 per day in fines from the Planning Department, which told Uber its repair services violated planning codes. Essentially, the company operated in a building permitted for auto repair that anyone could pay to use, not private repair services unavailable to the public.

There are 50 Jump bikes available for rent in the nearby Presidio, just a stone’s throw from the facility. Uber, which confirmed that it was leaving the Green Street site, declined to comment on whether they’d open a new repair facility near the Presidio.

Uber announced it would acquire Jump, the bikeshare company, in April. The company is operating 500 of its iconic red bikes in The City under an 18-month pilot program and another 50 that are only allowed in the Presidio, which borders the Marina District.

While Uber was given the chance to file permits with the Planning Department to make its facility legal, that would require it to severely curtail nighttime hours of operation since the facility is in a residential neighborhood, according to a Planning Department memo.

The property owner apparently did seek to change the permitted use of the space to allow Uber to stay, but a Planning Department memo said he missed deadlines to file for the necessary permits in a “timely” fashion.

“To date, you have failed to demonstrate compliance with the Planning Code,” read a notice to the property owner, John Bickford.

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