Music festival could sing loud for city coffers

A three-day music festival in Golden Gate Park in August, which is expected to draw 110,000 people, could be a financial boon for The City, organizers said Thursday.

Forty percent of the tickets for the event, which are $85 for one day and $225 for three days, have sold to out-of-town buyers, according to Gregg Perloff of event-organizer Another Planet Entertainment.

“I live in Los Angeles, and I come up for events like this one,” Leah Johnson said on Thursday, just before the Recreation and Park Commission unanimously approved plans for the festival. “I’m very excited.”

That kind of excitement could pay big dividends for Golden Gate Park, which is guaranteed a minimum $400,000 gift from festival proceeds — and up to $1.2 million if Outside Lands Music & Arts Festival sells out at 60,000 patrons per day, according to Margot Shaub with the Recreation and Park Department.

Since traffic through the western part of the park will be closed, Muni will boost service on several lines, including the 5-Fulton, the N-Judah and the 71-Haight, according to Pacifico Paculba, a Muni scheduler.

At the Board of Supervisors’ City Operations and Neighborhood Services Committee on Thursday, Supervisor Carmen Chu addressed neighborhood concerns about parking, security, wear and tear on the grounds and bathroom facilities.

“If there’s slight disruption from the festival, I think [the Sunset district] can handle it,” resident Robert Kowal said.

The festival, the first of its kind in the park, will feature headliners Radiohead, Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers and Jack Johnson.

bwinegarner@sfexaminer.com

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