Muni in 18th pedestrian accident since July

A Tuesday morning Muni accident on Market Street put a San Francisco woman in the hospital and brought the number of Muni-pedestrian accidents since July 1 to 18.

Five pedestrians have died after being struck by Muni vehicles during 2007, the most recent on Aug. 23, when 47-year-old John O’Neill was hit by a J-Church train near Glen Park station.

On Tuesday morning, a 50-year-old San Francisco woman was taken to San Francisco General Hospital with minor injuries after an accident involving an eastbound 9-San Bruno at Market and Sixth streets.

Approximately 5:50 a.m., the bus came to a stop on the corner, and the driver proceeded to let off and take on riders at the downtown stop, according to San Francisco police Sgt. Steve Mannina. When the bus had the green light, it began to roll again when the bus driver heard screams of “Stop, stop the bus!,” Mannina said.

The woman was found underneath the front of the bus but was not struck by any tires, according to Muni officials.

It was unclear how the woman ended up on the ground, but “it was deemed she was the party most at fault,” Mannina said, noting that she was crossing against a “Don’t Walk” signal.

“We’re grateful that the person is OK,” said Muni spokeswoman Maggie Lynch, who added that the driver was placed on nondriving status during the investigation.

The unidentified woman involved in Tuesday’s accident was the 18th pedestrian to collide with a Muni vehicle since July 1, the start of the fiscal year, according to Muni data.

Lynch said this was the first accident since a particularly dramatic two-week period in August that saw four people hit by Muni vehicles, two of whom died — including O’Neill — from injuries.

On Aug. 14, 83-year-old Marina Vafiadis was hit and killed by a 28-19th Avenue bus as she crossed Park Presidio at Balboa Street.

dsmith@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

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