MTA rolls out bike improvement projects

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency is continuing to chug along with its bike improvement plans – the ones it’s legally allowed to make, anyway.

On Nov. 25, a judge partially lifted a lengthy injunction against The City, which had prohibited it from making any bike-related improvements. As soon as the court action took place, the agency launched the projects it was allowed to.

As of last Wednesday, it had completed six bike lanes, and two more were just beginning, said MTA spokesman Judson True. In the SoMa neighborhood, Beale Street between Bryant and Folsom now has a new bike lane, as does Howard Street at Ninth Street.  Just south of Alamo Square, Scott Street between Oak and Fell streets has been restriped. In the Potrero Hill neighborhood, Mississippi Street now has a bike lane between 16th and Mariposa streets, and Kansas Street between 23rd and 26th streets has been restriped. Finally, in West Portal, a bike lane now lines Claremont Boulevard between Portola Drive and the traffic circle where Claremont, Taraval Street and Dewey Boulevard meet.

The agency has also begun a project to place a bike lane on the Clipper Street hill in between Douglass Street and Portola, between Noe Valley and Twin Peaks. They are also working on extending Mission Street’s bike lane onto the block of Otis Street between South Van Ness Avenue and Gough Street.

Busy Seventh Avenue in the Inner Sunset is currently being repaved, but once that is complete, it will be restriped with a bike lane between Lincoln Way up the hill to Lawton Street. An existing narrow bike lane picks up about half a block further up the hill and continues up Seventh, as it becomes Laguna Honda Boulevard.

The final bike lane allowed by the partially lifted bike injunction is along JFK Drive between Kezar and Transverse drives in Golden Gate Park, but that project is being overseen by the Recreation and Parks Department and won’t begin until Spring 2010.

About 65 bike racks have been installed, and Muni is adding about five a day, True said.

More than 100 “sharrows” have been painted on several streets. Sharrows are arrow-like designs painted on roads that indicate a bike route, without the dedication of an actual bike lane. The sharrows have been painted on Fifth street, Hayes Street, “The Wiggle” – a bike route through the Haight district – Fulton Street and Wawona Street.

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