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Motorcycle enthusiast? Listen up to stay safe

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) launched a new safety program Tuesday, seeking to reduce and eliminate injuries and deaths among people who ride motorcycles.

The program is a partnership between the SFMTA, San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) and the San Francisco Department of Public Health (SFDPH), and is an element of the City’s Vision Zero Education Strategy. Educational tips will be released, and a series of safety measures will be enforced to reduce collisions.

“People who ride motorcycles are some of the most vulnerable users of our roads,” said Mayor Ed Lee. “To reach our Vision Zero goal, we need to take action to prevent motorcycle crashes from occurring on our streets and this program will help reach this growing population and make sure they are traveling more safely.”

Motorcyclists are a growing population in San Francisco, with 22,853 registered in 2014. But the Office of Traffic Safety ranks San Francisco as having the highest fatal collision rate among California’s biggest cities, and fifth among all counties in the state. Nearly 20 percent of all traffic fatalities in San Francisco in 2015 involved motorcycles, despite them accounting for a small fraction of total road users.motorcycleSan FranciscoSFMTASFPDTransitVision Zero

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