More whistleblowers filing City complaints

Talk about not-safe-for-work: A city employee has been fired after they were found to be watching pornography on their work computer, according to a report by The City’s Office of the Controller.

That little news item was mentioned in a list of incidents reported to the city’s Whistleblower Program. The program was created by a proposition passed by voters in November 2003.

The program has grown year by year. This year, Whistleblower Program received some 465 complaints – up from 347 last year. The majority of this year’s complaints – 85 percent – came in over the Web site, while just a few percent were called in, according to the Controller’s report.

Of the complaints, 50.1 percent were investigated, while the rest lacked enough information to investigate, were referred to another department, were outside of the government’s jurisdiction, or didn’t require action, according to the report.

The pornography case was the only complaint listed that resulted in a firing. Among the other investigations mentioned was the case of a city employee accused of authorizing their own overtime and exaggerating the overtime they worked. Though the investigation didn’t substantiate the entire accusation, the employee is no longer eligible for overtime until all other employees have been offered those hours.

In another case, an employee was accused of running errands on work time using a city vehicle: that employee was suspended for 30 days and must reimburse The City for the time they weren’t at work. The employee’s vehicle must now be tracked by a global positioning system.

One City employee allegedly brought a dog along on a ride in a City vehicle, and was reminded that was against the rules, while another was not working a full work week, and was disciplined and placed under more careful supervision.
 

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsPoliticsSan FranciscoUnder the DomeWhistleblower

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

After the pandemic hit, Twin Peaks Boulevard was closed to vehicle traffic, a situation lauded by open space advocates. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
New proposal to partially reopen Twin Peaks to vehicles pleases no one

Neighbors say closure brought crime into residential streets, while advocates seek more open space

Members of the Sheriff’s Department command staff wore masks at a swearing-in ceremony for Assistant Sheriff Tanzanika Carter. One attendee later tested positive. 
Courtesy SFSD
Sheriff sees increase in COVID-19 cases as 3 captains test positive

Command staff among 10 infected members in past week

Rainy weather is expected in the coming week. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Rainstorms, potential atmospheric river expected to drench Bay Area in coming week

By Eli Walsh Bay City News Foundation Multiple rainstorms, cold temperatures some… Continue reading

U.S. Poet Laureate Amanda Gorman’s powerful reading was among the highlights of Inauguration Day. (Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times/TNS)
Inauguration shines light in this never-ending shade

Here’s to renewal and resolve in 2021 and beyond

Lowell High School is considered an academically elite public school. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Students denounce ‘rampant, unchecked racism’ at Lowell after slurs flood anti-racism lesson

A lesson on anti-racism at Lowell High School on Wednesday was bombarded… Continue reading

Most Read