More than one-fourth of mayor’s payroll funded by other departments

Other city departments contribute 28 percent of the cost of Mayor Gavin Newsom’s staff members — more than $1.3 million — a review of documents provided by the Mayor’s Office reveals.

With The City facing a projected $233million budget deficit next fiscal year, Newsom has fielded criticism in recent weeks for funding newly created and previously existing positions in his senior staff with money from other departments while placing a hiring freeze on vacant city jobs in other departments and calling for across-the-board belt-tightening proposals.

Newsom has deemed the criticism — some of which has come from members of the Board of Supervisors and legislative staff — politically motivated.

“Those individuals are doing work on behalf of the departments funding the positions,” Newsom’s chief of staff, Phil Ginsburg, said, noting its contribution to “interdepartmental collaboration and communication.”

“This is a very standard practice,” he said.

Last week, a budget analyst’s report said the Board of Supervisors should consider rescinding funding for 10 positions otherwise funded by other departments, but Newsom has blasted the report.

“It’s myth-making,” Newsom said, adding that “all of those new hires in the Mayor’s Office were existing, approved, budgeted positions where people had moved” with the exception of two newly created positions.

The total number of filled positions in the Mayor’s Office that are paid in part or full by other departments actually totals 19, according to documents his Communications Office provided to The Examiner.

Nancy Kirschner Rodriguez, the director of Government Affairs, and deputy chief of staff Catherine Dodd — both salaried at $143,123 — are funded by the Public Health, Economic and Workforce Development, and Human Services departments, among others. The newly appointed director of the Mayor’s Office on Criminal Justice, Kevin Ryan, has a $160,862 salary — 10 percent of which comes from the Police Department. The mayor’s education advisor, Hydra Mendoza, receives her $112,000 salary from the Department of Children, Youth and Families. All of these positions are noted within a list of 55 staff members — five of which are currently unfilled — provided by the Mayor’s Office.

Not listed among the 55 positions are three positions that were included in a Jan. 4 press release from the Mayor’s Office announcing Newsom’s “new team”: the Mayor’s Climate Protection Initiatives Director Wade Crowfoot, City Homelessness Policy Director Dariush Kayhan and Greening Director Astrid Haryati.

Crowfoot’s and Kayhan’s positions are newly created, and they earn $160,720 and $220,511 respectively, according to the budget analyst’s report. Haryati earns $140,856, according to the report.

The salaries of the 53 filled positions total more than $4.6 million, but of that total, $1,309,896 — or 28 percent — is funded through departments other than the Mayor’s Office or work orders (a contract from one department to another for an employee’s work).

The five vacancies in Newsom’s office include a deputy director of the Mayor’s Budget Office, deputy director of the Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice, a data analyst, an account clerk and an office manager, according to documents provided by his office.

dsmith@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Organizer Jas Florentino, left, explains the figures which represent 350 kidnapped Africans first sold as slaves in the United States in 1619 in sculptor Dana King’s “Monumental Reckoning.” The installation is in the space of the former Francis Scott Key monument in Golden Gate Park. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
What a reparations program would look like in The City

‘If there’s any place we can do it, it’s San Francisco’

Officer Joel Babbs at a protest outside the Hall of Justice in 2017 (Bay City News file photo)
The strange and troubling story of Joel Babbs: What it tells us about the SFPD

The bizarre and troubling career of a whistle-blowing San Francisco police officer… Continue reading

Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks at a COVID-19 update at the City College of San Francisco mass vaccination site in April. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Gavin Newsom under COVID: The governor dishes on his pandemic life

By Emily Hoeven CalMatters It was strange, after 15 months of watching… Continue reading

People fish at a dock at Islais Creek Park on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
What Islais Creek tells us about rising sea levels in San Francisco

Islais Creek is an unassuming waterway along San Francisco’s eastern industrial shoreline,… Continue reading

Deputy public defender Chris Garcia outside the Hall of Justice on Wednesday, June 16, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
As pandemic wanes, SF public defender hopes clients will get ‘their day in court’

Like other attorneys in San Francisco, Deputy Public Defender Chris Garcia has… Continue reading

Most Read