More students mean more facilities

Sequoia High School is getting ready to roll out a $19 million revamp of its athletic facilities, including a brand-new gym and the return of its tennis courts as a student population boom is expected.

Those courts were covered two years ago when the high school leased portable classrooms to Summit Prep Charter High School, which has since moved.

In the first $4 million phase of the gymnasium plan, the courts will be restored this summer while crews reconfigure the gym parking lot and shift the softball field, according to Don Gielow, construction manager for the district.

In later phases, a new gym will be built and the current one will be retrofitted with a weight room and wrestling pad, while the basketball and volleyball areas will be upgraded and a new covered lunch area will be added.

The district board is scheduled to vote on the first phase Wednesday.

Sequoia High School is expected to grow from its current population of 1,600 students to 2,000 by 2012, according to Superintendent Pat Gemma.

That, combined with the fact that Redwood City residents use the fields and track when school isn’t in session, makes the athletics plan a good investment, said board President Lorraine Rumley, whose daughter is on Sequoia’s soccer and track teams.

“Our sports teams are growing,” Rumley said. Sequoia’s football team is making a name for itself, and its girls’ varsity soccer team won the division title last year, Rumley added.

Funds for the athletics expansion will come from Measure H, a $70 million facilities bond approved by voters in 2004.

The bond has also allowed the district to build performing-arts centers at Carlmont, Woodside, and Menlo-Atherton high schools and buy property for Summit, Sequoia Adult School and a new charter high school in East Palo Alto.

The Sequoia High School District board meets Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. at the district offices, 480 James Ave., Redwood City.

bwinegarner@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

A server greets diners in a Shared Spaces outdoor dining area outside Napper Tandy’s Irish pub at 24th Street and South Van Ness Avenue in the Mission District on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020. San Francisco could choose to resume outdoor dining in the wake of a state decision to lift a regional stay-at-home order. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Regional coronavirus stay-at-home orders lifted as ICU capacity improves

Change in rules could allow outdoor dining to resume in San Francisco

A statue of Florence Nightingale outside the Laguna Honda Hospital is one of only two statues of women in The City. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
S.F. still falling short of goal to represent women in public art

City has few streets or public facilities not named after men

Methamphetamines (Sophia Valdes/SF Weekly)
New search launched for meth sobering center site

Pandemic put project on pause but gave health officials time to plan a better facility

Hasti Jafari Jozani quarantines at her brother's San Francisco home after obtaining several clearances to study at San Francisco State University. (Photo courtesy Siavash Jafari Jozani)
Sanctions, visas, and the pandemic: One Iranian student’s bumpy path to SF State

Changing immigration rules and travel restrictions leave some overseas students in limbo

Woody LaBounty, left, and David Gallagher started the Western Neighborhoods Project which has a Balboa Street office housing historical items and comprehensive website dedicated to the history of The City’s West side. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Outside Lands podcast delves into West side’s quirky past

History buffs Woody LaBounty and David Gallagher have been sharing fun stories about the Richmond and Sunset since 1998

Most Read