Montessori school may switch to K-8

Parents in a district that already offers a plethora of magnet programs and year-round schedules may get another educational option for their children.

Tonight, teachers and parents from the San Mateo-Foster City School District will present the case for adding middle school classes to the North Shoreview Montessori School.

Making North Shoreview K-8 would allow the district to take advantage of empty classrooms at the school, give parents another middle school optionand keep students who might otherwise leave the district.

“There aren’t many K-8 Montessori programs in the area or even the state, so it provides an opportunity to allow students to continue their education through middle school,” said Joan Rosas, assistant superintendent for student services.

North Shoreview first-grade teacher Julie Mamis said she has sent her oldest child out of the district to private middle schools to find smaller class sizes. Montessori schools use different teaching methods and focus on independent learning and small-group interactions to help students.

“I don’t believe in a large middle school model,” she said.

Rosas said the district would likely limit the school to 30 students for each of the middle school grades, adding approximately 90 students to the current population of 262.

Anticipating high demand if the school does implement middle school classes, Alyssa Moore said priority enrollment would be given to parents from North Shoreview and Parkside Elementary. Moore has spearheaded the efforts to expand North Shore­view for almost two years.

The San Mateo-Foster City School District Board meeting will be held at 7 p.m. today in the district offices, 1170 Chess Drive, in Foster City.

jgoldman@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

Just Posted

Pregnant women are in the high-risk category currently prioritized for booster shots in San Francisco. (Unai Huizi/Shutterstock)
What pregnant women need to know about COVID and booster shots

Inoculations for immunosuppressed individuals are recommended in the second trimester

Examiner reporter Ben Schneider drives an Arcimoto Fun Utility Vehicle along Beach Street in Fisherman’s Wharf on Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Could San Francisco’s tiny tourist cruisers become the cars of the future?

‘Fun Utility Vehicles’ have arrived in The City

The Science Hall at the City College of San Francisco Ocean campus is pictured on Jan. 14. The Democrats’ Build Back Better bill would enable free community college nationwide, but CCSF is already tuition-free for all San Francisco residents. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
What Biden’s Build Back Better bill would mean for San Franciscans

Not much compared to other places — because The City already provides several key features

A directional sign at Google in Mountain View, Calif., on Oct. 20, 2020. Workers at Google and Amazon are demanding their companies pull out of Project Nimbus, a $1.2 billion contract to provide cloud services for the Israeli military and government. (Laura Morton/The New York Times)
Google and Amazon employees criticize $1.2 billion cloud services contract with Israel

‘We can create a world in which tech companies can thrive without doing harm’

Most Read