Monte Diablo crossing path spurs 101 closures

More road closures are on tap for U.S. Highway 101 as crews continue the first phase of construction needed by Caltrans before the agency can begin widening the freeway for an auxiliary lane.

The busy freeway will not have a new lane in each direction between Third and Millbrae avenues until spring 2011. Before then, three overcrossings need to be expanded and other work needs to be done in order for a new lane to fit.

Crews are using a 300-ton crane to erect two 187,000-pound concrete “bathtub” girders in each direction to construct a new Monte Diablo pedestrian crossing in San Mateo, which can accommodate an auxiliary lane beneath it.

The new pedestrian overcrossing should be completed by the end of October, said Caltrans spokeswoman Lauren Wonder. The project was originally supposed to be finished by Aug. 15. This is the first step in the auxiliary lane project and is slated to cost $2.2 million to $2.5 million, she said.

The new overpass will be taller, wider and feature new fencing. The extra-lane project is slated to cost more than $156 million.

Highway 101 southbound between Third and Peninsula avenues will be closed between 1 a.m. to 5 a.m. on Thursday and Friday.

Crews already closed this area and were expected to complete work on the northbound side by early Thursday morning.

mrosenberg@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

Just Posted

A man walks past the main entrance to the Hotel Whitcomb at Eighth and Market streets on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Closing hotels could disconnect hundreds from critical health care services

‘That baseline of humanity and dignity goes a long way’

Dreamforce returned to San Francisco in person this week – but with a tiny sliver of past attendance. (Courtesy Salesforce)
Dreamforce returns with hundreds on hand, down from 170,000 in the past

High hopes for a larger Salesforce conference shriveled during the summer

The remnants of trees burned by the Dixie Fire near Antelope Lake, Calif., on Friday, Sept. 3, 2021. (Christian Monterrosa/The New York Times)
California’s wildfires invisible effect: high carbon dioxide emissions

This summer California fires emitted twice as much CO2 as last year

Stock photo
Latinos are dying at a lower rate than white and Black people in California. However, Latinos have had the sharpest increase in the death rate in the last month, rising from 2.4 deaths per 100,000 people in August to 4 per 100,000 in September. (iStock)
Who’s dying in California from COVID-19?

In recent months, those who are dying are younger

The numbers show nearly 14 percent of San Francisco voters who participated in the Sept. 14 recall election wanted to oust Gov. Gavin Newsom from elected office. (Shutterstock photo)
(Shutterstock photo)
How San Francisco neighborhoods voted in the Newsom recall

Sunset tops the list as the area with the most ‘yes’ votes

Most Read