Money spotted for ShotSpotter technology

Funding for a high-tech gun detection system was restored Friday morning and police academy classes were spared cancellation in a proposed city budget that is headed to the full Board of Supervisors for adoption.

After making a slew of cuts to Mayor Gavin Newsom’s proposed $6.5 billion budget Thursday, the Board of Supervisors’ Budget and Finance Committee took a recess and made final funding decisions starting at 3 a.m. Friday.

Prior to recess, the committee voted 3-2 to kill $60,000 in funding for maintenance of the ShotSpotter system, which can pinpoint the location of shots fired, and recently was installed in the Bayview and Western Addition.

Newsom made a late-hour technical adjustment to the budget, not requiring a committee vote, that reinstated the funding for the devices.

“Theytried to do away with ShotSpotters, but didn’t succeed. That’s a victory for programs using technology to solve crimes,” Newsom said.

Newsom also called it a victory for “uniformed officers” that members of the committee could not succeed in canceling any of the three scheduled police academy classes.

The committee voted 3-2 around 3 a.m. to postpone the classes by two months and delete three empty police captain positions, for a savings of $1.6 million.

The committee had more than $30 million worth of slashes it made to Newsom’s proposed budget and new revenue that it reallocated Friday morning. The money went to restore cuts made to health services and to fund other needs including additional gardeners for city parks, an increase in library hours and added staff for same-sex marriages.

The committee voted 4-1 to send it to the full board for approval.

Daly, the most outspoken critic of Newsom’s spending priorities, said he would not support a city budget until all cuts made to The City’s “safety net” are restored.

The chair of the committee, Supervisor Jake McGoldrick, praised the committee’s efforts.

“In the Health Department, more than $20 million we have been able to restore for health services,” he said.

Newsom submitted a balanced city budget for approval June 2 after closing a projected $338 million budget deficit.

The Board of Supervisors is scheduled to take an initial vote on the budget, which can still be change, July 22 and a final vote July 29.

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

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