Mixed-use development proposed at Mission BART Plaza site

Mixed-use development proposed at Mission BART Plaza site

The crime-prone corner of Mission and 16th streets – the location of the 16th Street Mission BART station – could be transformed if a recently proposed, mixed-use development is approved by The City.

The project could add one more structure to the changing landscape of a neighborhood already at the center of much of The City's gentrification battles.

The $82 million, 350,000-square-foot project would encompass about half a city block at 1979 Mission St., stand 10 stories and incorporate the Mission BART Plaza on the northeast corner of the intersection, according to planning documents filed earlier this month.

The two existing buildings at the location, including a Walgreens, will be torn down for a more imposing structure that will act as a transit hub and area landmark.

No residents would be displaced, according to project planners.

The new site will include an inner courtyard, 351 residential housing units, a 161-car parking garage and 32,000 square feet of ground-level retail space, much of which will be filled by a grocery store. The retail space will wrap around the BART station and “create a safe, engaging revitalization of the BART Plaza,” according to planning documents.

Developers hope the mixed-use proposal will help revitalize the adjacent area.

The project applicants have not said what kind of affordable housing the building will include, but their filing notes a variety of options. Some of those options include making 12 percent of the housing on site affordable, providing 20 percent of the affordable housing off site or paying an in lieu fee.

Maximus Real Estate Partners, the applicant, additionally has hopes that its project will have a positive impact on the neighborhood's safety, but District 9 Supervisor David Campos is still reserving his judgment.

However, in September Campos' office introduced the developers to neighborhood groups to allow any concerns to be considered, said Campos' legislative aid, Nate Allbee.

Within 60 days a letter will be sent to the developer listing any issues or concerns planners have so that they can be addressed before any development applications are filed.

“I think it definitely depends on how the project is actually realized,” said Allbee on whether or not Campos will support the development.

BART officials told The San Francisco Examiner they only learned of the proposal a few days ago and haven't been involved up to that point.

While the plan was filed with the San Francisco Planning Department Oct. 18, it is in its earliest stages and would have to complete a series of approvals before any construction begins.

1979 Mission Street.pdf by San Francisco Examiner

16th Street Mission BART stationBART PlazaBay Area NewsdevelopmentPlanningSan Francisco

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