Mirkarimi joins protesters, blasts Ellis Act evictions

A city supervisor lambasted building owners Thursday who invoke the power of a controversial state law that allows for the eviction of renters.

Supervisor Ross Mirkarimi joined more than 20 protesters gathered Thursday outside of Frank Howard Allen Realtors’ office on Fulton Street to sound off against the real estate company, which is evicting renters from its seven-unit apartment building at 1530 McAllister St. by using the Ellis Act.

The act, which became state law in 1986, allows building owners to get out of the rental business by evicting tenants. Proponents say the law creates more homeownership opportunities and protects the rights of property owners.

The “misguided” law results in “kicking out those who are vulnerable,” such as seniors and children, said Mirkarimi, whose district includes the McAllister Street building.

Mirkarimi has also authored two resolutions in an attempt to diminish the authority of the Ellis Act. These resolutions come before the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday. One urges the San Francisco Sheriff’s Department to no longer enforce Ellis Act evictions. The other resolution asks the Sheriff’s Department to begin recordingwhich of the evictions it oversees are Ellis Act evictions. To date, the department’s records do not specify the eviction type.

As The City’s real estate market has improved over the last two years, Ellis Act evictions have increased, with 286 units in 2004 and 299 units in 2005, according to the resolution.

David Weingarten, who has lived with his wife and two kids at the McAllister building for the last 12 years, found out on April 1 that he had 120 days to leave what he called home.

“If we lose our apartment that most likely means we have to leave this area. We are a working family. We can’t afford to live in the area.”

Weingarten’s rent has remained at an affordable level through rent control laws.

jsabatini@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsLocalPolitics

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Those who stick around San Francisco on long holiday weekends can enjoy a slower pace, uncrowded streets and beloved institutions like cable cars. <ins>(Kevin Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
These empty San Francisco streets: A holiday dream

We’re here because we can be, and because we have nowhere else to be

It’s disheartening to see that Bill Graham Civic’s marquee isn’t announcing upcoming concerts. (Screenshot/Bill Graham Civic Twitter)
A cruise through The City with the ghosts of rides past

I take my time and don’t even mind the occasional traffic jams

A ban on smoking or vaping in multi-unit buildings has drawn opposition from cannabis advocates, who say it would leave users with no legal place to consume a legal substance. (Shutterstock)
Cannabis group slams Yee’s proposed apartment smoking ban as ‘classist’

Legislation would impose fines of $1,000 a day on repeat violators

The most dangerous behaviors by drivers include failing to yield right-of-way at crosswalks, unsafe speeding and failing to stop at red lights or stop signs. <ins>(Ekevara Kitpowsong/Special to S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Hetch Hetchy in Yosemite, which supplies water to San Francisco, is among the concerns of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, which is undergoing a change of leadership. <ins>(Courtesy SFPUC)</ins>
Changes in leadership at SFPUC spark concern, hope for future water policy

Will agency’s new commissioner continue to support Big Ag?

Most Read