Mills Montessori moving to South S.F.

The Mills Montessori School is looking forward to tapping into the demand generated by the biotechnology industry as it moves from Millbrae to South San Francisco.

With lots of working people comes the need for children’s services, said Simin Fallah, the owner and director of Mills Montessori, and the “birthplace of biotechnology” is a good area if you’re in the day-care business.

“We’re open 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.,” Fallah said. “It is an advantage for parents who are working.”

Darin Wright, whose son started at Mills last September, said the independent learning community Mills will bring to South San Francisco will be welcomed.

“I think it’ll definitely add to the quality of life because it would add more (educational) options,” Wright said.

The school, which had its 18-year home sold last spring by the Millbrae School District, has signed a lease with the South San Francisco Unified School District to take over nearly 14,000 square feet of the 31,382-square-foot vacant Hillside School. The lease comes at the price of $1 per square foot.

But a use permit has taken five months to get, South San Francisco Unified Superintendent Barbara Olds, said. The city’s Planning Commission approved a permit at its meeting Thursday.

Olds said she wasn’t concerned about competition from Mills Montessori because it was predominantly a preschool. She was excited about getting the school into the Hillside site.

“You don’t want a closed school. It just promotes vandalism,” Olds said of the property, which has been closed since June 2004.

The district is still looking for tenants for five classrooms and four portables, she said. Mills Montessori and some offices for the San Mateo County Office of Education will take up more than half of the buildings’ floor space, according to a South San Francisco staff report.

Mills Montessori must move out of their space on Alp Way in Millbrae by June 2007. The Millbrae School District sold the 10.7-acre site for $20.1 million rather than continue to lease it because they felt it made better financial sense.

dsmith@examiner.com

Just Posted

The Hotel Whitcomb on Market Street was one of many hotels that took in homeless people as part of The City’s shelter-in-place hotel program during the pandemic.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Closing hotels could disconnect hundreds from critical health care services

‘That baseline of humanity and dignity goes a long way’

Pachama, a Bay Area startup, is using technology to study forests and harness the carbon-consuming power of trees. (Courtesy Agustina Perretta/Pachama)
Golden Gate Park visitors may take a survey about options regarding private car access on John F. Kennedy Drive, which has been the subject of controversy during the pandemic.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Your chance to weigh in: Should JFK remain closed to cars?

Host of mobility improvements for Golden Gate Park proposed

Dreamforce returned to San Francisco in person this week – but with a tiny sliver of past attendance. (Courtesy Salesforce)
Dreamforce returns with hundreds on hand, down from 170,000 in the past

High hopes for a larger Salesforce conference shriveled during the summer

“Radiant Fugitives” by Nawaaz Ahmed is a poignant family tragedy. (Courtesy photo)
“Radiant Fugitives” by Nawaaz Ahmed is a poignant family tragedy. (Courtesy photo)
‘Radiant Fugitives’ explores ties that bind, and divide, a Muslim family

Nawaaz Ahmed’s SF-set novel links personal, political conflicts with passion, empathy

Most Read