Millbrae to revisit archway issue this fall

Residents will be asked to weigh in this fall on a proposed archway over Hillcrest Avenue at El Camino Real, more than 10 years after it was first proposed to attract shoppers to the city’s shopping district.

Chamber of Commerce President John Ford said he hopes to particularly encourage shopping in the northern area of Broadway around Park Boulevard, which can get overlooked by passers-by on El Camino Real.

“We want to pull as many people onto Broadway as we can,” Ford said.

The project was estimated to cost about $100,000 in 1995.

Though the figure has likely jumped significantly since then, Community Development Director Ralph Petty said the city wanted to hold off on doing a new cost estimate until they heard some input from the City Council and residents on preferred design and materials.

Officials last discussed the archway in May, after the Chamber of Commerce asked the committee to revisit the item now that many new developments are underway in the downtown area.

City Manager Ralph Jaeck said the first set of plans and renderings for the Art Deco-style arch emblazoned with “Millbrae” across the top were completed when the city was discussing general improvements to downtown.

The project is out of date anyway, as officials expected, because the state has added new requirements to its building code since the initial design, Petty said.

Petty expects to bring the issue to the council in October.

The city’s Downtown Process Committee was scheduled to discuss the issue at a Wednesday morning meeting, but the group did not have a quorum, Ford said.

tramroop@examiner.com

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