Millbrae to launch paving crackdown

Millbrae, which ranked next-to-last in road quality in San Mateo County, is launching a $1.2 million residential street repaving project the likes of which the city’s residents have not seen in more than 10 years.

The 2008 Street Repair Project is part of the city’s 10-year Streets Capital Improvement Plan, approved in October 2006.

The city receives state and federal funding for main street repairs, but this year’s repaving marks the first time in more than a decade that the city’s residential streets will be improved, said Public Works Director Ron Popp.

The project to replace the worst 5 percent of roads in Millbrae needs to be funded by the city, Popp said.

“Our street does need it,” said Katherine Boston, a 55-year resident of San Jose Avenue in the city’s Marina Vista neighborhood. “They’ve re-patched it several times and it needs to be redone.”

In addition to streets in Marina Vista, other streets the city is looking at repairing include the Bayside Manor neighborhood by Hillcrest Boulevard and the streets off Anita Drive by the Green Hills Country Club, Popp said.

“The street turns into gravel if it’s not fixed, and once that happens you start having potholes and the street starts coming apart,” Popp said.

The Metropolitan Transportation Commission, which assigns a score based on condition to the roads in each city in the Bay Area, gave Millbrae the second-lowest rating in San Mateo County, better than only Half Moon Bay. Foster City has the county’s best roads, the MTC said.

Millbrae’s 125 lane-miles of roads are classified as “at risk,” according to the MTC. If officials continued to neglect the need for repairs the roads would rapidly deteriorate and maintenance would cost five to 10 times as much, said MTC spokesman John Goodwin.

With better roads, Goodwin said, “certainly you’re going to have a better ride and you’re going to inflict less damage on people’s suspensions.”

Before running for office, Councilmember Marge Colapietro said she remembered calling City Hall to alert them to large potholes she saw while driving through Millbrae. It is prudent for the city to determine which streets need the most work as opposed to seeking a bond to repave the entire city, she said.

After the city determines which streets it will repave, the project will hopefully begin before the winter, Popp said.

mrosenberg@examiner.com

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