Millbrae, Pacifica flaunt green facilities to Lantos

A handful of Peninsula cities making concerted efforts at becoming cleaner and greener — including converting restaurant grease into energy and banning Styrofoam — are not going unnoticed.

Both Millbrae and Pacifica are scheduled to show off their refurbished wastewater treatment plant facilities to Rep. Tom Lantos, D-San Mateo, as the longtime local congressman tours environmentally efficient systems on the Peninsula today.

Calera Creek Water Recycling Plant in Pacifica and the Millbrae Wastewater Treatment Plant — both stops on Lantos’ Peninsula visit — are two projects in the county that have reduced emissions, waste or both. The tour is not open to the public.

“Lantos believes that the search for viable alternative and renewable energy sources should be a key national priority,” spokeswoman Lynne Weil said.

Calera Creek Water Recycling Plant, which treats 3.5 million gallons of sewage daily in an underground system, started operating last year with 1,800 solar panels. Pacifica Councilwoman Julie Lancelle has called the plant a point of pride for the city.

More recently, the facility, which has been credited with revitalizing city wetlands using treated runoff, will soon irrigate Sharp Park Golf Course, parks and fields with an estimated 50 million gallons of treated runoff annually. Plans are also under way for the city, following in the steps of Millbrae and Burlingame, to incorporate biodiesel fuel to power its treatment plant.

In Millbrae, work was completed last year on a biodiesel cogeneration plant in a joint undertaking between the city and Chevron Energy Solutions. The system uses gas produced from donated restaurant grease; the technology has increased the amount of green power generated at the plant by approximately 40 percent, Public Works Director Ron Popp said.

The system is one of a handful of efforts — including a ban on Styrofoam — to remove and limit environmentally damaging material within the city.

tramroop@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocalPeninsula

Just Posted

Salesforce Tower and several other buildings in downtown San Francisco can be seen through the fog; climate scientists report that The City’s beloved mascot may be on the decline. (Courtesy Engel Ching)
Is San Francisco losing its fog? Scientists fear the worst

This isn’t just an identity crisis for San Franciscans. It’s an ecological problem

The Bay Area is vying to be one of 16 communities,<ins> spread across the U.S., Canada and Mexico,</ins> to host the 2026 FIFA World Cup soccer championships. Games would be played at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara. (Courtesy Bay Area Host Committee, World Cup 2026)
Bay Area launches bid to host World Cup games in 2026

FIFA officials pay San Francisco a visit as they tour prospective venues

Carmen Chu became City Administrator in February, after her predecessor, Naomi Kelly, resigned in connection to the ongoing corruption scandal at City Hall. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Report knocks City Administrator for innefficiency, lack of transparency

‘A culture that allows corruption to take place’

Outside Lands boasts high-quality food and drink from dozens of purveyors, and many are local.<ins> (Courtesy Outside Lands)</ins>
Outside Lands is for food lovers

85 food vendors, 40 wineries, 30 breweries make the festival nourishing to gluttonous

California Highway Patrol officers watch as Caltrans workers remove barricades from homeless camp sites as residents are forced to relocate from a parking lot underneath Interstate 80 on Monday, May 17, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
San Francisco’s broken promise to resolve homeless encampments

‘There is an idea that The City is leading with services, and they are not’

Most Read