Measures for November ballot put forward

The number of boxes to check on the November ballot took a step toward being increased Tuesday when supervisors and the mayor submitted at least eight measures.

Tuesday was the deadline to introduce measures that would need six votes from supervisors to make it onto the November ballot.

Board of Supervisors President Aaron Peskin introduced two measures to increase the tax on property sales of $2 million or more and to close a loophole that keeps partners of business from being counted toward payrolls.

In the last several years, The City has seen a boom in its property transfer tax, a three-tiered tax that was expected to bring in $123.5 million in revenue this fiscal year, according to the Controller’s Office. But now, the Controller’s Office expects the tax to bring in just $91.6 million.

Peskin’s measure would create a fourth tier by doubling the tax on property sales of $2 million or more from 0.75 percent to 1.5 percent, according to documents.

“It doesn’t affect the vast majority of properties in this town,” Peskin said.

The measure could bring in an additional $30 million to $50 million annually, Deputy Controller Monique Zmuda said.

Supervisor Jake McGoldrick submitted a similar measure that would create several tiers of taxation starting at sales of $1 million and continuing to $2 million-plus. If the transfer exceeds $2 million the buyer would pay a tax of 1.75 percent, according to the language.

Another measure was an effort to plug a potential $43 million revenue hole after a state court ruled a local tax paying for the 911 service in Union City required voter approval.

To avoid a similar situation in The City, Mayor Gavin Newsom, with board support, introduced an ordinance that repeals the emergency response fee, imposes an access line tax on phone lines and modernizes the telephone users tax. A second measure would make it city policy that revenue from the access line tax was intended for 911.

Supervisor Chris Daly also introduced three measures, all of which are related to housing.

In May, supervisors submitted 17 proposed amendments to the city charter that range from removing the voter-approved mandate for police minimum staffing levels to making a move toward more city-owned power. The Board of Supervisors has until July 24 to vote on whether those go to the November ballot.

July 17 is the deadline for submission of measures that have four signatures from supervisors or by the mayor to be put on the ballot.

dsmith@sfexaminer.com

Ballot measures proposed

Tuesday was the deadline to introduce measures that will make it onto the November ballot if they receive six votes from supervisors.

SUPERVISOR AARON PESKIN

» Increase the property transfer tax for sales of $2 million or more to 1.5 percent

» Require firms, such as an architectural or legal, to pay payroll taxes on “partners”

SUPERVISOR JAKE McGOLDRICK

» Creates a staged tax increase on property sales starting at $1 million

SUPERVISOR CHRIS DALY

» Prohibit harassment by a landlord and provide rent reduction fines for harassing landlords

» Prohibit owner-move in evictions of units with children under 18 and amend definition of disability

» Places two-unit buildings into the condo-conversion lottery

MAYOR GAVIN NEWSOM

» Repeal emergency-response fee that pays for 911, impose access-line tax, modernize telephone users tax

» Would direct revenue from access-line tax for 911 service

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