Measure F vote a rare even split

In an Election Day fluke, San Bruno voters were exactly split on Measure F, a half-cent tax hike that would have raised the city’s sale’s tax to the highest in the Bay Area.

On Wednesday, San Bruno Mayor and Measure F proponent Larry Franzella said he was stunned by the vote count of 1,934 yeses and 1,934 noes.

“Everyone who thinks their vote doesn’t mean anything just needs to study Measure F,” he said.

The fate of the measure, which would bring the city’s sales tax up to 8.75 percent, lies in the provisional and absentee ballots yet to be counted, said San Mateo County Elections Manager David Tom.

“It’s a very interesting anomaly to have the same exact number of yes and no votes on election night, but it remains to be seen how the remaining votes affect the outcome (of the race),” Tom said.

Tom anticipates the remaining ballots will be countedby the end of next week.

Election offices in all counties are required to certify the results by Dec. 4, though San Mateo County officials are hoping to have it done by Thanksgiving, Tom said. Anyone requesting a recount must do so within five days of certification.

Backers of Measure F argued the tax was essential to balance the city’s budget and prevent cuts to city services. Opponents said the measure would sidestep the two-thirds vote required for special taxes and would drive out retail business.

tbarak@examiner.com

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