Top grocery and restaurant companies like McDonald’s, Dollar Tree, Burger King, Taco Bell and Walmart began switching to exclusively cage-free meat and eggs. (Examiner file photo)

McDonald’s promises to beef up security at Haight-Ashbury restaurant, pay $40K to SF

San Francisco is lovin’ it at McDonald’s once again.

After hundreds of complaints of criminal activities at the McDonald’s in the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood, the fast-food giant has promised to increase security at the site and pay $40,000 to The City, the city attorney’s office announced Tuesday.

The agreement comes after City Attorney Dennis Herrera in May sent a letter to the Oak Brook, Ill.-based McDonald’s Corporation, threatening to sue over what he said were “numerous complaints regarding narcotics trafficking in and around a McDonald’s restaurant located on your property at 730 Stanyan Street.”

The increased security measures promised by McDonald’s include posting a security guard on the property during all hours of operation, adding security cameras and fencing to secure the landscaped portion of the property, and restricting parking access when the restaurant is closed.

McDonald’s must also consult with the San Francisco Police Department monthly for the first six months following the agreement to review safety issues, and pay $40,000 to The City, according to the city attorney’s office.

“I am grateful to McDonald’s Corporation and the franchisee for working with us cooperatively to create a safer environment for the neighborhood and a more welcoming experience for their customers,” Herrera said in a statement. “By working collectively we were able to identify concrete measures to prevent further public nuisance and still avoid litigation.”

In his May 12 letter, Herrera emphasized that the McDonald’s had generated more than 1,000 calls to police for service since January 2012, more than any other business in the area. Criminal activity included arrests for sale and possession of various drugs and incidents of assaults, fights, auto burglaries and dog attacks.Crime

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