Former Supervisor Malia Cohen introduced a measure that renamed and expanded the powers of what is now known as the Department of Police Accountability. (Mike Koozmin/S.F. Examiner file photo)

Former Supervisor Malia Cohen introduced a measure that renamed and expanded the powers of what is now known as the Department of Police Accountability. (Mike Koozmin/S.F. Examiner file photo)

Mayor taps former Supervisor Malia Cohen to serve on Police Commission

Mayor London Breed on Monday nominated former Bayview neighborhood Supervisor Malia Cohen to serve on San Francisco’s Police Commission.

Cohen, an elected member of the state Board of Equalization, was president of the Board of Supervisors when her second term ended in January 2019.

She became known as an outspoken voice for police reform after officers fatally shot Mario Woods, a 26-year-old Black man, in her district in late 2015.

The following year, she successfully pushed for voters to reshape the troubled Office of Citizen Complaints into the Department of Police Accountability.

“Malia has consistently advocated for, and won, significant reforms to policing in San Francisco in order to keep people safe,” Breed said in a statement. “I’m confident that she’ll continue to move this issue forward on the Police Commission.”

The Police Commission is charged with setting policy for the San Francisco Police Department and disciplining officers.

The nomination comes a month after the Board of Supervisors rejected Breed’s previous choices for the panel, Nancy Tung and Geoffrey Gordon-Creed.

The board questioned whether they were the right candidates to drive reform following the Minneapolis police killing of George Floyd.

When the board rejected Tung, the supervisors urged Breed to nominate another Chinese American who has a reputation as a reformer.

Breed has yet to announce who she will tap for the second open seat on the commission.

Cohen will have to clear the Board of Supervisors Rules Committee before she is confirmed.

mbarba@sfexaminer.com

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