San Francisco Police Officers Association chief negotiator Gregg Adam questions Police Chief Bill Scott during an arbitration hearing at the Hall of Justice on April 17, 2018. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

San Francisco Police Officers Association chief negotiator Gregg Adam questions Police Chief Bill Scott during an arbitration hearing at the Hall of Justice on April 17, 2018. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Mayor Farrell praises contract agreement reached with SF police union

San Francisco and the Police Officers Association have struck a three-year agreement that includes a 9 percent pay raise over three years.

The contract, which comes after arbitration, includes a 3 percent pay hike in each of the next three fiscal years, beginning July 1. The third-year increase is contingent upon city analysis in that year projecting no deficit in excess of $200 million in the following fiscal year.

The police union was seeking a higher pay increase of 12 percent. The three percent pay hike next year is expected to cost The City $12.24 million.

SEE RELATED: SF police union calls contract proposal to streamline reform ‘insulting’

“Today’s arbitration award is a fair and equitable pay increase that supports our police officers and reflects a responsible, sustainable approach to our City’s budget,” Mayor Mark Farrell said in a statement.

The arbitration struck from the contract one of the most controversial proposals from The City, which would have decreased the union’s bargaining rights to expedite police reform recommended by the Department of Justice. Police reform advocates had rallied around this provision.

The decisions over remaining points of contention in the contract negotiations were announced late Friday and posted on the Department of Human Resources website. The decisions were reached by the three-person arbitration board, comprised of neutral arbitrator David Weinberg, Carol Isen for Department of Human Resources and Gary Delagnes, representing the POA.

The Board of Supervisors will vote in the coming weeks on the contract proposal. Politics

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