Mayor Breed wants to make a temporary outdoor live music program permanent

San Francisco Mayor London Breed proposed legislation on Tuesday that would make permanent a temporary outdoor live music program that...

San Francisco Mayor London Breed proposed legislation on Tuesday that would make permanent a temporary outdoor live music program that began during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Just Add Music, or JAM, was launched in September 2020 to help bars, restaurants and music venues attract customers and maintain their businesses amid pandemic-related restrictions.

JAM, however, is set to expire on Dec. 31.

The proposed legislation put forth by Breed, along with the city’s Entertainment Commission, would not only make the program permanent but also give business owners with existing JAM permits the chance to transfer their outdoor permit to indoor locations or transfer the use for a one-time event.

“Entertainment and the arts are an important part of our city’s economy and culture,” Breed said in a statement. “Thanks to the work of the Entertainment Commission, this program provided a lifeline for our artists and musicians to survive through the pandemic, and brought life back to our communities.”

The commission’s executive director Maggie Weiland said the program is key to helping the live music industry recover.

“The JAM permit program has been a successful intervention to help our struggling entertainment and nightlife industry weather the pandemic with safer outdoor activity, and to keep our neighborhoods vibrant with arts and cultural experiences during a tremendously isolating time,” Weiland said.

Since it began, The City has issued 250 permits at outdoor locations, Breed’s office said.

In addition to making the JAM program permanent, back in March, Breed also proposed making permanent The City’s Shared Spaces program, which also began during the pandemic and allows permitted businesses to set up shop outdoors in public spaces.

— Bay City News

Winless in Seattle: What we learned from Niners’ loss

It started out as a madcap affair in Seattle on Sunday, loaded with tips and picks, tightropes and trickery.

By Al Saracevic
‘King Tides’ give San Francisco a watery glimpse of its future

City seeks solutions as coastal flooding could become the new normal

By Jessica Wolfrom
Dire water warnings confront San Francisco and beyond

‘We will face challenges that I don’t think modern California has ever really seen before’

By Jessica Wolfrom