(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Mayor Breed unveils $446.1 milion COVID-19 budget proposal

Mayor London Breed unveiled the budget proposal Tuesday for The City’s COVID-19 response, laying out San Francisco’s plan to fight against the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

The proposed budget through next June totaled $446.1 million, funding a range of programs and services from public communications and health operations to housing and food security.

“That’s money that I wish we could divert to other places,” Breed said at a news conference. “Unfortunately, this is the reality of today. And I hope that’s not the reality of our next budget cycle.”

The budget proposal would allocate $184.9 million for health operations, including $55.9 million for testing, $44.2 million for personal protective equipment and $30.3 million for operations of the Department of Public Health.

The proposal includes $61.8 million to fund food security and human services, supporting programs such as Great Plates Delivered SF through September, an emergency food delivery program for older adults, and the expansion of the Pit Stop program through next June, which provides clean and safe public toilets.

Another $16.5 million would be slated for emergency communications and operations at the COVID Command Center and Joint Information Center. The funding will be allocated for temporary staffing budget, maintenance and supplies, along with translation services, among other operations.

The budget proposal would also allocate $182.9 million to housing and shelter programs, including hotels for shelter and quarantine.

Meanwhile, Breed urged San Franciscans to change their behaviors, especially in places like Dolores Park. She said many people have contracted COVID-19 from gatherings.

Despite the lack of federal government response and coordination with state and local officials, “we prepared. We worked hard. We redirected sources. We redirected staff from all over the city. And we adjusted to our situation,” Breed said. “Because of that, San Francisco has been a model for the rest of the country. But I want us to be even better than that. So it’s up to us to change our behavior.”

There are signs of hope, according to Dr. Grant Colfax, the director of the Department of Public Health. He said there are 85 new COVID-19 cases daily, a drop from the high point a few weeks ago.

Nonetheless, Colfax noted that cases could increase again. The City has been on the highest level of alert for the past seven weeks. And he reminded people to stay vigilant and wear face masks.

“It’s like remembering your wallet or your key: Remember your mask,” Colfax said at the news conference. “This is a good habit to develop, and a habit that we’re going to need to have with us for some time. My mask protects you, your mask protects me. This is something we can all do, and indeed, [something] we must do for each other.”

Bay Area NewsCoronavirusPoliticssan francisco news

Just Posted

Cabernet Sauvignon grapes sit in a container after being crushed at Smith-Madrone Winery in St. Helena, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 9, 2021. (Courtesy Smith-Madrone Winery)
San Francisco’s ‘Champagne problems’ — Wine industry suffers supply chain woes

‘Everywhere you turn, things that were easy are no longer easy’

Glasses behind the bar at LUNA in the Mission District on Friday, Oct. 15, 2021. Glassware is just one of the many things restaurants have had trouble keeping in stock as supply chain problems ripple outward. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
SF restaurants face product shortages and skyrocketing costs

‘The supply chain crisis has impacted us in almost every way imaginable’

A Giants fans hangs his head in disbelief after the Dodgers won the NLDS in a controversial finish to a tight Game 5. (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
Giants dream season ends at the hands of the Dodgers, 2-1

A masterful game comes down to the bottom of the ninth, and San Francisco came up short

<strong>Workers with Urban Alchemy and the Downtown Streets Team clean at Seventh and Market streets on Oct. 12. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins> </strong>
<ins></ins>
Why is it so hard to keep San Francisco’s streets clean?

Some blame bureaucracy, others say it’s the residents’ fault

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi — seen in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday — touted Congressional Democrats’ infrastructure bill in San Francisco on Thursday. (Stefani Reynolds/The New York Times)
Pelosi touts infrastructure bill as it nears finish line

Climate change, social safety net among major priorities of Democrats’ 10-year funding measure

Most Read