Massage parlor employee denies lying

A pretrial conference for a possible plea deal was postponed until November for a 52-year-old San Mateo resident who denied accusations that she lied on a permit application to work in a massage parlor that offered illegal sexual favors.

Gouzhen Zhou had been working in a Redwood City massage parlor for a year before police discovered falsified information in her permit application.

In the May 2006 application with the city, Zhou indicated that she had never been associated with a massage parlor that was shut down or implicated by authorities.

Zhou, however, was discovered to have worked at massage parlors in Pasadena and Brea in Orange County, where both businesses were the center of investigations involving illegal sexual incidents.

Redwood City police discovered her work experience in May of this year, when Zhou was arrested for perjury.

Prosecutors say Zhou admitted that she worked in the massage parlors in Southern California, but that she was confused by the permit application because of a language barrier.

She is charged with one count of felony perjury, a penalty that carries up to four years in state prison.

Zhou pleaded not guilty to the charge on May 16. Her pretrial conference was postponed until Nov. 19.

bfoley@examiner.com

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