Marina Shores developer returns with new concept

The developers of the Marina Shores project, one of the most controversial proposals in city history and the subject of a successful ballot initiative opposing it, are preparing to try again with a scaled-down plan.

The last time Glenborough-Pauls' Paul Powers proposed a housing development on the 33-acre Bayfront parcel near Pete's Harbor, residents voted down his plan to build 240-foot-tall residential buildings in a referendum in November 2004. This time, he's seeking community input by showing the new concept to businesses and residents' groups long before the city launches its planning process.

While the first version of Marina Shores included 1,930 condominiums in buildings 180 to 240 feet tall, plus 50,000 square feet of retail and 150,000 square feet of offices, the new design scales that back to 75- and 120-foot-tall buildings with 796 condos and townhomes, 10,000 square feet of retail and no office space. Powers is also proposing a 200-room hotel, plus an undetermined amount of open space.

“This [proposal] will evolve through the city process,” Powers said. “We don't want anyone to have the impression that this is an accomplished fact.”

Many who opposed the original Marina Shores plan did so because of the size of the project, but also because they felt they were not included in the city planning process until it was too late to make changes.

Powers met last week with the Friends of Redwood City, the group that evolved from residents' political fight against Marina Shores.

“There are signs that the city is going about it in a different way [this time],” said Cathy Moyer, one of FORWC's leaders.

The city's public hearing process on the new proposal will kick off July 11, according to planner Jill Ekas.

bwinegarner@examiner.com

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