Marina Apple Store opens to big fanfare

The frothy-mouthed craze for Apple products combined with Black Friday created a perfect consumer storm in the Marina when The City’s third Apple Store opened.

Hundreds of people lined up along Chestnut Street — one of the Marina’s main drags — waiting for the store to open Friday morning. Crowds had thinned out by midday, but there were still plenty of customers to keep clerks busy.

Apple already had two stores in The City: one at Stockton and Ellis streets downtown and another in Stonestown Galleria. Both opened in 2004.

The new store occupies the former Walgreens site on Chestnut Street near Steiner Street; Walgreens moved over one building to the first floor of the Marina Theater. The Chestnut store is larger than the Stonestown space, but is only a single story as compared with downtown’s two-level store.

And it’s the Marina, so dogs were allowed inside the new store.

The new store is Apple’s 15th in the Bay Area. The company says its 202 stores worldwide saw more than 100 million visitors during the last fiscal year. The Stockton Street store is often jam-packed with downtown shoppers checking out the latest in the Cupertino company’s technology.

Elena Sanchez, who lives in Pacific Heights, called the downtown store “ridiculous” with its crowds as she browsed for a MacBook and possibly an iPod. But despite the lighter crowd on Chestnut, she said, she had some trouble finding a clerk to tell her about the products.

“It’s still hard to wrangle anyone to help me,” Sanchez said.

Ray Mina, a Cow Hollow resident, had quite the different experience, saying it took all of five minutes to buy his MacBook.

“I figured, ‘Hey, maybe there’d be a rare discount on a Mac,’” he said, noting that the store’s opening shared the same date as one of the year’s busiest shopping days.

At least one person may have gotten too liberal with the discounts, as it appeared he was led to a back room in handcuffs by plainclothes security.

dsmith@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

Just Posted

A felled tree in Sydney G. Walton Square blocks part of a lane on Front Street following Sunday’s storm on Monday, Oct. 25, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
After the rain: What San Francisco learned from a monster storm

Widespread damage underscored The City’s susceptibility to heavy wind and rain

Plan Bay Area 2050 is an expansive plan guiding the region’s growth and development over the next three decades. The regional plan addresses progressive policy priorities like a universal basic income and a region-wide rent cap, alongside massive new spending on affordable housing and transportation infrastructure. (Shutterstock)
$1.4 trillion ‘blueprint’ would address Bay Area’s housing, transit woes

Analyzing the big ticket proposals in ‘Plan Bay Area 2050’

A felled tree in San Francisco is pictured on Fillmore Street following a major storm that produced high winds and heavy rains on Oct. 24, 2021. (Photo courtesy of Philip Ford)
Storm updates: Rainiest October day in San Francisco history

Rainfall exceeded 10 inches in parts of the Bay Area

On Sunday, California bore the brunt of what meteorologists referred to as a bomb cyclone and an atmospheric river, a convergence of storms that brought more than half a foot of rain to parts of the Bay Area, along with high winds, concerns about flash floods and the potential for heavy snow in the Sierra Nevada. Much of the Bay Area was under a flash flood watch on Sunday, with the National Weather Service warning of the potential for mudslides across the region. (NOAA via The New York Times)
Bomb cyclone, atmospheric river combine to pummel California with rain and wind

What you need to know about this historic weather event

The Department of Building Inspection, at 49 South Van Ness Ave., has been mired in scandal since since its creation by voter referendum under Proposition G in 1994. (Courtesy SF.gov)
The Department of Building Inspection, at 49 South Van Ness Ave., has been mired in scandal since its creation by voter referendum under Proposition G in 1994. (Courtesy SF.gov)
Whistleblowing hasn’t worked at the SF Dept. of Building Inspection

DBI inspectors say their boss kept them off connected builders’ projects

Most Read