Marin leaders set to reject toll on Doyle

Marin County officials are poised today to send a strong message against a planned toll along Doyle Drive, part of a proposal to raise money to rebuild the seismically unsafe San Francisco-side approach to the Golden Gate Bridge.

The plan to add a toll on the southern approach to the iconic span — that would be in addition to that already required to cross the bridge — has provoked the ire of those in the North Bay, who are the majority of bridge users during peak times.

The proposal calls for a $2 toll for users of Doyle Drive and comes as the Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District Board is considering an increase to the bridge’s toll from $5 to $6.

The Transportation Authority of Marin, a regional board representing the county, is scheduled to vote today on a resolution opposing any toll on Doyle Drive. The vote follows a recent decision by the Golden Gate Bridge board, made up of San Francisco and North Bay members, to postpone taking a position on the matter, after Marin board member Al Boro, who also sits on the TAM, argue that since it’s a state road, the state should pay for it.

Time is running out since key funding for the Doyle Drive rebuild is part of a $159 million federal grant that is contingent upon San Francisco obtaining the legal authority from the state legislature by March 31 to collect tolls on Doyle Drive.

San Francisco District 1 Supervisor Jake McGoldrick, who sits on the board, said the toll is the only way to raise needed money to fully fund the $1 billion road project.

McGoldrick said the odds that the county transportation authority would get the needed state approval in time are about “50-50,” but said that efforts are currently underway to try and postpone the deadline. Work is also being done to secure additional funding, he said, that could decrease the proposed Doyle Drive toll to $1.

jsabatini@examiner.com

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