Supervisor Sandra Lee Fewer speaks at a news conference alongside Supervisor Rafael Mandelman where they announced legislation that would establish a Safe Sleeping Sites Program for unsheltered people outside the first Safe Sleeping Village at Civic Center on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Supervisor Sandra Lee Fewer speaks at a news conference alongside Supervisor Rafael Mandelman where they announced legislation that would establish a Safe Sleeping Sites Program for unsheltered people outside the first Safe Sleeping Village at Civic Center on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Supervisors want to require safe sleeping sites to accommodate every homeless person

At least two supervisors want to mandate The City provide safe sleeping sites for every homeless person who has no other access to shelter within 18 months.

Legislation introduced Tuesday by Supervisor Rafael Mandelman with the support of Supervisor Sandra Fewer would make it city policy “to ensure that every person experiencing homelessness in San Francisco has a safe place to sleep overnight.”

To that end, the legislation would require that the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing provide a network of temporary so-called Safe Sleeping Sites to accomodate the thousands of homeless persons The City has no room to place in permanent supportive housing or other shelter like hotels and Navigation Centers.

Safe Sleeping Sites are sanctioned outdoor camping spaces for unsheltered people that provide some amenities and services. The City has recently opened several, including one in the Civic Center, one in the Tenderloin and one on Stanyan Street, among others.

“In San Francisco, in 2020, no one should have to spend the night in a tent on a median or curled up in a doorway,” Mandelman said in a statement. “Despite investing billions of dollars in addressing homelessness over the years, we have never taken responsibility for the many thousands of unhoused people who can still not access a supportive housing unit, shelter bed, or hotel.”

He said his proposal, “A Place for All,” will “ensure that all unhoused people have a safe place to spend the night so that no one has to camp on our streets, and that no neighborhood has to offer up its sidewalks as shelter of last resort.”

The legislation doesn’t change The City’s priority to place homeless persons in permanent supportive housing.

Within 60 days of the law going into effect, the department would have to submit a plan to the mayor and Board of Supervisor to open enough Safe Sleeping Sits to serve 500 homeless people within nine months and a plan to open up the rest of the sites to serve the others who need them.

The plan would identify costs and the contracting process that the department would adhere to for groups to operate the sites.

There are specific requirements for each site including they must accommodate up to 150 people and remain open to them for at least the hours of 8 p.m. to 8 a.m. The department would also have to plan for persons leaving the site to not return to the street and provide transportation to and from the sites.

The legislation is expected to undergo a public hearing by a board committee after 30 days.



jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsHousing and HomelessnessPoliticssan francisco news

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

A construction worker watches a load for a crane operator at the site of the future Chinatown Muni station for the Central Subway on Tuesday, March 3, 2021. (Sebastian Miño-Bucheli / Special to the S.F. Examiner)
Major construction on Central Subway to end by March 31

SFMTA board approves renegotiated contract with new deadline, more contractor payments

Neighbors and environmental advocates have found the Ferris wheel in Golden Gate Park noisy and inappropriate for its natural setting. <ins>(</ins>
Golden Gate Park wheel wins extension, but for how long?

Supervisors move to limit contract under City Charter provision requiring two-thirds approval

San Francisco school teachers and staff will be able to get vaccinations without delay with the recent distribution of priority codes. 
Shutterstock
SF distributes vaccine priority codes to city schools

San Francisco has received its first vaccine priority access codes from the… Continue reading

COVID restrictions have prompted a benefit or two, such as empty streets in The City. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Taking the scenic route through a pandemic

Streets of San Francisco are pleasantly free of traffic

Kelly Marie Tran and Awkwafina provide the voices of the title characters of “Raya and the Last Dragon.” <ins>(Courtesy Disney)</ins>
‘Raya and the Last Dragon’ boasts full-scale diversity

Though familiar in plot, Disney’s latest is buoyed by beauty, pride and power

Most Read