Mandarin program expanded at SMFC school

All enrolled students at College Park Elementary in the San Mateo-Foster City School District will now be able to participate in the school’s expanded Mandarin-immersion program.

“Our Mandarin Scholars program provides students of all languages and backgrounds the opportunity to learn one of the most influential languages of the 21st century,” school Principal Diana Hallock said in a press release. “What a rare and fabulous opportunity for our fortunate students and our school.”

The school district announced that College Park Elementary School will be receiving a $1.4 million federal grant from the Foreign Language Assistance Program. The school wanted to expand the current K-3 Mandarin-immersion program into a pre-kindergarten through 12th-grade Mandarin Chinese scholars program.

According to the press release, College Park has partnered with UC Berkeley, the National Center for Chinese Language Pedagogy,

College Park Mandarin Pre-School, the Shaolin Chinese Cultural Center, the Kuai Le Mandarin Afterschool Enrichment Program and the San Mateo Unified High School District in order to meet specific project goals.

School officials hope the program will serve as a national model for replication by other schools and school districts by utilizing modern, diverse technologies to promote Mandarin learning.

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