Mike Koozmin/The SF ExaminerFull disclosure: Police Chief Greg Suhr

Man shot, killed by San Francisco cops wanted to avoid jail

The man shot and killed by San Francisco cops last week was a two-strike offender with multiple felony convictions who “refused” to go back to prison, according to police.

Steven Michael Young was stopped by officers from the Northern Police Station about 1:25 p.m. Wednesday at Larkin and Bush streets for a vehicle registration investigation, police Chief Greg Suhr said Monday during a community meeting.

Instead of turning over his license and registration, Young ran. Young reportedly left the vehicle and sprinted east on Bush Street, then turned south on Larkin Street. Two of the three officers conducting the traffic stop chased him, Suhr said.

Roughly halfway down Larkin, Young turned toward the officers and fired six rounds from a .32-caliber handgun. One officer then fired two rounds at Young, hitting him in the face, Suhr said.

Young was taken to San Francisco General Hospital, where he died from his injuries Thursday.

Young, a 33-year-old San Carlos resident, had two strikes under California’s three-strikes law, according to Suhr. He arrived in San Francisco three days prior to the shooting. Suhr said Young’s family believed he was here to enjoy The City because he was aware of a warrant for his arrest in San Mateo County, but Young said he did not want to go back to prison.

“His parents believed he would not be taken alive,” Suhr said. “He did not want to go back to jail.”

Young had prior convictions on narcotics and burglary charges, according to police Cmdr. Mike Biel.

Young’s family, though, told police they were grateful no police officer or member of the public was hurt in the shooting.

akoskey@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsCrimeCrime & CourtsLocalSan Francisco Police DepartmentSFPD

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden have taken different approaches to transit and infrastructure funding. <ins>(Yuri Gripas/Abaca Press/TNS)</ins>
Bay Area transit has big hopes for a Biden administration

The best chance for local agencies to get relief may be a change in federal leadership

BART Ambassadors are being called on to assist riders in social situations that don’t require police force. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Unarmed BART ambassadors program formalized with a focus on community service

Public safety and police reform are key elements in campaigns of Board members Dufty and Simon

San Francisco DJ and producer Jah Yzer livestreams most mornings from his home. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Roots & Tings build community through music

Lateef the Truthspeaker, Jah Yzer and Winstrong call for voting as a form of healing

On Oct. 13, people lined up to vote early for the presidential election in Southlake, Texas. <ins>(Shutterstock)</ins>
<ins></ins>
Five things to watch for in the run-up to Nov. 3

Down-ballot races, as much as the presidency, will determine the future course of this nation

WeChat (Shutterstock)
U.S. District Court denies Trump request to shutdown WeChat app

A federal judge in San Francisco denied a request by the U.S.… Continue reading

Most Read