Courtesy of San Mateo County Sheriff's OfficeJose Monroy

Man pleads no contest to bringing drugs into San Mateo County Jail

A man who was arrested on an outstanding warrant for a misdemeanor drunken driving case pleaded no contest Tuesday to a felony count of bringing narcotics into jail. He faces a sentence of four years in state prison, San Mateo County District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe said.

Jose Rafael Monroy, 32, also has a prior strike felony conviction. He was arrested June 19 by Burlingame police on the outstanding warrant for drunken driving, Wagstaffe said. When he was brought to jail, Monroy denied he had any drugs or other contraband.

Monroy was told that if any drugs were found on him during booking, he would face a new felony offense, Wagstaffe said. During the booking process, he was searched by a sheriff’s deputy who discovered that Monroy had hidden 0.837 grams of methamphetamine in his rectum.

When Monroy was asked about the meth, he reportedly said, “Guess I stay here for a couple more months. That’s OK, I don’t have anywhere else to be.”

Monroy pleaded no contest to the charges Tuesday in exchange for prosecutors seeking no more than four years in state prison, Wagstaffe said.

He remains in custody on $50,000 bail and will return to court for sentencing Nov. 13.Bay Area NewsCrimeCrime & CourtsJose Rafael MonroySan Mateo County District Attorney's OfficeSteve Wagstaffe

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